APNewsBreak Adopted kids ranch denied license

August 18, 2019 0 Comments

center_img Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milk Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family But neither Sterkel nor the Russians mentioned the Ranch For Kids’ dispute with state regulators that now stretches back more than two years, after the Board of Private Alternative Adolescent Residential and Outdoor Programs declined to renew the ranch’s provisional license in June 2010.An inspection that was part of the license application process found deficiencies that included a failure to show the ranch’s buildings are up to code, the lack of a disaster plan, no background checks or commercial drivers’ licenses for employees and no student handbook or statement on the rights of the program participants.Beyond that, Sterkel denied the board any information about the children at the ranch. Board attorney Mary Tapper described the refusal in court documents in which she referred to the ranch as “RFK.”“RFK flatly refused to inform the Board how many children were enrolled at RFK including their ages and gender. Because many of the children enrolled at RFK are reported to have severe emotional and disciplinary challenges, the Board sought this information for the protection of the health, safety and welfare of the children,” Tapper wrote. Comments   Share   More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Sponsored Stories Ranch owner Joyce Sterkel is appealing that order in court, saying the ranch has become part of a church mission and is no longer under the board’s authority. Sterkel did not immediately return a call on Wednesday.Last month, Russian children rights ombudsman Pavel Astakhov and human rights envoy Konstantin Dolgov showed up at the Ranch For Kids’ gates, demanding entry to check on the adopted children from Russia in Sterkel’s care. They questioned whether the children were receiving necessary care or treatment at the remote ranch.Ten of the 25 children there are from Russia, with others from China, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Haiti, Ethiopia and other countries. Their ages vary, and their troubles range from fetal alcohol spectrum disorder to the aftereffects of spending their early lives in difficult conditions in orphanages.The Russians were denied access that day, with Sterkel previously denying any claims that the children are mistreated or lacking care. Parents with children at the ranch currently or in the past have risen to Sterkel’s defense, saying her program provides a necessary service for adopted children struggling with medical and behavioral problems.last_img read more