Corpus Callosum hosts final showcase of semester

September 17, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgPedal to the metal · A bike-powered phone charger was one of seven student projects featured at the Corpus Callosum final showing which took place Wednesday evening in the Annenberg Innovation Lab. – Hawken Miller | Daily TrojanUSC Corpus Callosum, a Viterbi School of Engineering student organization that creates projects that combine art and technology, hosted its final showing Wednesday night at the Annenberg Innovation Lab.Corpus Callosum’s showcase featured seven projects from students whose majors range from mechanical engineering to sculpture. These projects included a phone charging station powered by bicycle, a LED wearable heart rate monitor, a spherical hologram, a video game powered by sound, a feedback system for plants and a brain shaped enclosure that represented both the right and left sides of the brain.“The first project outside is a geodescent dome model of the brain,” said Linda Xu, events director for Corpus Callosum. “They have these laser lights that they bought online that will project into the left hemisphere of the brain, and it looks very ordered because when you look at it the left hemisphere represents your logical thinking.”On the other side, students created a more artistic interpretation of the brain by bouncing the lasers off of a reflective surface.“The right side of your brain is creativity and inventiveness,” Xu said. “So they reflected the lasers onto this aluminum sheet so that when it reflects it is kind of disorganized.”The diversity of students’ backgrounds and majors represented the vision of the organization to bring art and technology together. It especially reflected the principles of its two founding members — twin alumni Jon and Brendan Dugan.“We are a club that uses science, technology, engineering and math to make art,” said Lili Lash-Rosenberg, president of Corpus Callosum. “The two students who founded it are two twins, one was a major in mechanical engineering and the other was a major in fine arts.”After seeing the gap between the fields of engineering and art, the Dugan twins decided that a change needed to be made.“They noticed that there was a big gap between their two fields and there are actually a lot of similarities between the two,” Lash-Rosenberg said. “In both of them you use what you’ve learned about the world and trial and error and a lot of different testing to create something new.”Corpus Callosum reflected these founding principles across each project by basing its ideas off an artistic thesis. One project that especially adhered to these principles was the display of the video game that uses sound input for play.“Our idea was started just with the idea of something audiovisual,” said Zach Lower, a sophomore majoring in computer science and business administration. “What we landed on was a game that used entirely sound as its input.”The project creators hope to continue to make their designs more streamlined and applicable. The Bio Pet project hopes to combine both technology and botany to monitor life information of potted plants to better inform owners of care.“We wanted to give a plant an extra voice to communicate with humans,” said Kevin Prabhakar, a freshman majoring in business administration. “We will hook up a moisture sensor and photoresistor into it, and it will give you readings on how much sunlight is available or how much water is available.”Bio Pet’s goal is to use social media platforms to show the status of the plant to users real time. The plant will essentially talk to the user, asking for more water or light.“The next steps are to make it send you a tweet or a text message,” Prabhakar said. “The eventual goal is you can have it outside, hook up a plant to it and, once you find out all the different values, it will send you a tweet every time it needs something.Part of the draw of the club comes from the fact that it allows students to explore an interdisciplinary approach between completely different majors.“The club encourages students to think about what’s feasible and then change the design based on what you can actually do in the time that you have as well as the resources,” Lash-Rosenberg said. “It is also important for students to be able to use those skills and work with people of all majors to combine and collaborate to make a product.”last_img read more