People

May 12, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgL’Oreal’s new HR director Nikki Rolfe has had plenty of time to indulge herlove of photography as she is something of a part-time explorer. She loves to travel and her most recent trip followed in the footsteps ofGhengis Khan – a fascinating trip between Pakistan and China via Kazakhstan. She joins the company from Whitbread and is hoping to have a positive impacton the firm’s people and the business itself. Joining L’Oreal is a dream move for Rolfe, as not only does she get to workin a fast-paced and flexible environment, she also gets to see some of herfavourite cosmetic brands first hand. “I was delighted to discover the company produces some of my favouritebrands. More and more I’ve become a big fan of the anti-wrinkle creams!”she says. With a degree in biochemistry and a graduate of the old Institute ofPersonnel Management, Rolfe is excited about taking up the new role. “I love the international dimension and the dynamic verbal culture ofthe company, both of which are new to me. The fast-paced culture here allows agreat deal of flexibility,” she says. One of her main duties will be to encourage diversity through theinternational career development programme and graduate recruitment scheme. She will even be able to toast the success in her new job, as she is also akeen winemaker. CV2001 HR director, L’Oreal (UK)1999 HR director, Whitbread1998 Senior manager, training and development, J Sainsbury1992 Total quality and business improvement manager, SavacentreOn the movePaul Croft is the new head of MitelNetworks’ Training Academy. He will be responsible for building a learning anddevelopment infrastructure that ensures the technical competency of its staff.Prior to taking up this post, he played a central role in setting up thecompany’s leadership programme. Prior to that he was European training managerfor Delco Electronics. The academy will work in partnership with employees tohelp satisfy career aspirations as well as providing the opportunity to developskills.Doug Taylor joins logisticsspecialists Tibbett & Britten as director of operations. His brief is tomanage and co-ordinate operations in France, Iberia, Benelux and Germany.Taylor has previously worked as a director for Hays Group and ChristianSalvesen. The Tibbett & Britten Group employs 33,000 people in 33 countriesand has revenues of over £1.5bn.William M Mercer has added FredMarchlewski to its UK executive team as head of HR consulting. He joins fromTowers Perrin, where he was head of people, performance and solutions. His newrole will focus primarily on developing and expanding the HR consultancy. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. PeopleOn 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Buy tickets for Hoboken’s 2nd Annual Pizza Fest

May 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_img× HOBOKEN–The 2nd Annual Pizza Fest will take place on Saturday Oct. 13 at Our Lady of Grace, 400 Willow Ave.Pizza Fest will feature several Hoboken pizzerias including Napoli’s, Tony Boloney’s, The Brick, Hot House Pizza, and more.Attendees will be able to try pizza from every vendor listen to live music and participate in pizza-themed games and contests, including a pizza eating contest. Pizza Fest benefits the local nonprofit, True Mentors — an organization that offers one-to-one mentoring by patching children ages 7-17 with adult mentors in the community.Tickets are $25 and go on sale on Wednesday Sept. 12. and roughly 700 people are expected to attend.More event details can be found at www.hobokenpizzafest.com.last_img read more

‘Gangnam Style’ by the Yard

March 1, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgEvery now and then a song sweeps the world, catapulting its singer into the stratosphere of super-fame. “Gangnam Style” is that kind of phenomenon, performed by South Korea’s Park Jae-sang, better known to nearly 1.6 billion YouTube viewers (the most ever) as Psy.On Thursday the Korea Institute at Harvard University sponsored “A Conversation with Psy” for a packed audience of Harvard students, staff, and faculty and the international press at Memorial Church, in a session that was also live-streamed online.The event was introduced by Carter J. Eckert, the Yoon Se Young Professor of Korean History. Slipping on a pair of sunglasses, à la Psy’s trademark style, Eckert suggested that Harvard hasn’t been so close to cool since Ralph Waldo Emerson’s 1838 speech on transcendentalism.Alexander Zahlten, assistant professor of East Asian languages and civilizations, put “Gangnam Style” into the context of the investments Asian countries are making in exporting their cultures, and their growing influence in the West.Psy then entered and shook hands, and the audience cheered as he walked to the pulpit.“Isn’t life beautiful?” he asked.Psy, of course, wasn’t always a superstar. He was born in 1977 in the well-to-do Gangnam district of Seoul. As the only son, he was expected to take over the family business, building a “semiconductor equipment thing.” To avoid that, he spent four years in the late ’90s in college in Boston. First, he studied business at Boston University, then dropped out and enrolled at the Berklee College of Music.He left Berklee without a degree (“My nickname was W-W-F: Withdrawal, Withdrawal, Fail,” he said to a chorus of sympathetic “Awws!”), went back to South Korea, started making K-pop, and danced on television. He released his first album in 2001. For the next 10 years, Psy sang, danced, and made music.In July of 2012, he released “Gangnam Style.”“When I wrote [‘Gangnam Style’] last summer, the economy was so bad,” he said.“Everyone was so poor. My only goal was to make them laugh, with the song and choreography, so I tried to be as ridiculous as possible.” He explained that he intentionally developed the now-famous “horsey dance” so that anyone could do it.Then, lightning struck. By August, “Gangnam Style” was No. 1 on iTunes, and by November it was the most viewed video ever on YouTube. In December, it became the first YouTube video to reach one billion views.“Isn’t that amazing?” Psy said. “I am so glad, because the crowd doesn’t know [the meaning of the words], but they look so happy” when listening to the song and doing the dance.“I think there is something beyond the language,” he said, trying to explain the song’s popularity. “We can assume it’s the music. But that’s the boring answer. I think it’s the word ‘fun.’”Psy has won accolades and dozens of music and video awards, but he said the moment he really knew he’d made it was when Madonna asked him to perform with her at Madison Square Garden. He said when he arrived, Madonna was lying on the stage, and she told him, “Honey, you can touch anywhere on my body on the stage.”He said his first thought was, “I’m her honey?”His actual response was, “Really?”“I’ve got to be humble,” he continued. “This doesn’t happen to everyone, especially Asian artists. I dreamed someday, some Korean artist would be recognized in the American market, but I didn’t dream that it would be me. I have a very special body shape, so I never thought it would be me.“It’s weird,” he continued. “I am facing you guys like this. But life is weird. I’m happy and so proud. It’s so unrealistic to make a speech at Harvard.”During a question-and-answer session, he advised, “Please be positive. That’s the biggest power on the planet.”And, almost echoing his cool predecessor Emerson’s words at the Divinity school so many years ago (“Thank God for these good men”), Psy said, “I thank God all the time, because what I want to do is what I can do.”He then graciously thanked the audience for their time, and treated everyone to a Korean dinner.“A Conversation with Psy” was co-sponsored by the Office for the Arts at Harvard “Learning from Performers” series and the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.last_img read more

New solar energy system connected to Cuba’s national grid

September 26, 2020 0 Comments

first_img 59 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! NewsRegional New solar energy system connected to Cuba’s national grid by: – February 18, 2012 Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Share Cuban flag. Photo credit: flags.netSANTIAGO DE CUBA, Cuba (ACN) — A micro photovoltaic system has been connected to Cuba’s national power grid in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba, with a view to evaluating the technology under tropical weather conditions and leading feasibility studies before it is expanded to the rest of the country.The director of the Center for Solar Energy Research (CIES) – a pilot institution — told local media that the new system, made up of 30 solar panels, will feed 7.5 kilowatts into the grid.During the course of this year, the system’s power is expected to be doubled and generate about 70 kilowatts a day, he added.Ruben Ramos said a monitoring system had also been implemented for the further training of the staff in other institutions exploring the new technology that has been endorsed due to its effectiveness by Germany, United States, China, Japan and Spain, among other countries. Because of its climate, Ramos explained, Cuba has a great solar energy potential that would enable the development of technological solutions to replace the use of traditional fossil fuel which could bring about savings to the national economy and greater benefits for the environment.Though no previous studies had been carried out in the island, the CIES is equipped with the required monitoring technology, including automatic systems for the recording of data measuring the performance of the modules, among others, that will make it possible, for example, to determine the amount of CO2 that is prevented from being released into the atmosphere. According to Ramos, they will be able to assess the advantages of the alternative energy source, and master the technology in order to certify it and be able to implement it in the rest of the country.Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more