Allied’s omega-3 brand on a roll

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgAllied Bakeries has unveiled plans for its Kingsmill Head Start omega-3-enriched brand as it pushes into the functional foods market.Jackie Harold, senior product manager for Kingsmill rolls and snacks, said the Head Start brand would be developed for many other products, with Allied soon to begin advertising.Speaking as Kingsmill this week unveiled Head Start rolls, aimed at children, Harold said the taste of the Head Start bread and rolls was indistinguishable from that of normal Kingsmill bread, which would continue to be sold.Production was little different from normal production, she said, apart from the need to ensure the fish-derived omega-3 did not contaminate other products.The white rolls are produced at bakeries in Cardiff, Belfast and Orpington in Kent. Packs of six are already on sale in Sainsbury’s and Tesco. Head Start bread, enriched with omega-3, launched in July.last_img read more

Learn from our mistakes

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgI was once asked why did I keep attacking the government, to which the answer was: ’Because they are there.’ Really, however, we should have equal contempt for all politicians as, in my view, very few, if any, could run a small business and succeed.I imagine we are all fed up with reading so-called government statistics. When I was young, we would have called them lies. But in this politically correct age, we are not supposed to call people that tell lies liars, we call them politicians.Apparently there are now 37,000 more young unemployed than there were in 1997 and there are 1.24 million 16-24-year-olds not in education, employment or training. These are not government figures, but independent research. But why should that be, when so many immigrants who arrive here seem to find work?While we cannot put the clock back, why can we not learn from our mistakes? Dare I say it? The reason why so many are unemployed is that they receive more money from our taxes for doing nothing than they could by learning a trade.high state pay-outYet at the same time, the cost of employing them is far too high for most employers – which would suggest that the state pay-out is far too high, not that industry is not paying enough.After all, wages are ultimately determined by our customers and the truth is the young are difficult to employ, as they so often leave school semi-illiterate and with no work ethic.Before anyone starts tearing their hair out, I am not saying all the young are useless, but far too many are. Whenever any of us find a good, keen youngster, we are all overjoyed and really enjoy training them and watching them progress in their chosen career.Even the government is now considering keeping them in school until they are 18. But good grief! If they can’t teach them to read by the age of 16, why should two more years make a difference?THE truth in clichésNow, well into the first decade of the 21st century, I think about the hoary old clichés that are still as true as the day our great grandfathers first said them. Two that come to mind are: “your first loss is your best loss” and “act in haste, repent at leisure”.Far too often, we get an idea, set it up and then find, for various reasons, it is not working as well as we’d hoped – such as it takes too much time to manage or it is just not making money. The problem then becomes, “How quickly do we drop it?” In the main, as I have so much practice with bad ideas, I want to drop them as quickly as I can. If it is useless today, why should it be any better tomorrow?The longer you delay, the more you lose. Whereas if you move quickly, you stand a chance of moving it onto someone else – if it is a shop lease, for example. Always remember that the core business is what really matters. I wish I could remember that before going off on a tangent. nlast_img read more

A sense of place

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgYou have to be strong to be a baker,” says Caroline Parkins – strong-willed, that is, and not just physically fit, if you’re to fight the tide of mediocrity that she believes has dumbed down our bread.Mediocre is not a criticism that can be levelled at her artisan bakery in Bridport, Dorset, where the product list changes in response to seasonal bounties of fruit and veg, mostly grown for her by small suppliers. “If I feel stale, which you inevitably do, I’ll take myself off with half a dozen cookery books,” says Parkins.A good sprinkling of Elizabeth David, Eliza Acton and obscure, often nameless, regional authors, usually relieves the “baker’s block” and helps to leaven an imagination that has already brought the seaside town Jurassic Foot Loaf, Dorset Cider and Cheese Cottage Loaf, and Cheese and Chilli Beer Bread. “We’re constantly updating product lines. Part of that comes automatically if you’re using seasonal and local produce.”A trained cook and accidental baker, Parkins fell in love with the Leakers’ family bakery, its doubled-decked brick-floored ovens and “practically antique” mixer, which achieve what she wants – “to make good bread in a decent way… slowly”.In fact, after five years on the baker’s watch, she’s not in a hurry to do anything other than build on a reputation for using traditional techniques to meet modern expectations for exceptional tastes, such as her takeaway Delhi Delight vegetable curry in a naan bread bowl. “I believe in local, small and slow,” she says. “I’d rather do one thing properly than run six shops.”This rather goes against the grain in the manic world of corporate bakery, where fortunes rise and fall faster than a three-minute fermentation. “Plant bakers always seem to be in crisis,” observes Parkins coolly. “Small, artisan bakers are successful because people appreciate the difference in our bread.”A ban on hydrogenated fats, as well as extra yeast to make up for foreshortened proving times, are all part of the Leakers Bakery culture. Organic plays a big role, although Leakers is not accredited because of the prohibitive cost and administration involved, says Parkins. “I think it’s important for the big people to register, but our consumers already believe in our food.”And that’s largely to do with building a strong sense not only of place, but also of continuity – even going so far as to tempt the granddaughter of the bakery’s founder out of retirement just to make her famously rustic Dorset Apple Cake, which is popular enough to keep one person employed two days a week. “There are outcrops of strong support for local food in areas where people are still close to the food source,” says Parkins. “I suppose it is difficult in some areas for bakers to find a local supplier, but it’s always possible.” nlast_img read more

Kellogg in snacks deal

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgUS-based Kellogg Company, in Michigan, is expanding its capacity, after acquiring the assets of IndyBake Products LLC and Brownie Products, a privately- held contract manufacturing business.IndyBake and Brownie Products produce cracker, cookie and frozen dough items at two manufacturing sites, located in Seelyville, Indiana and Gardner, Illinois. These sites will now be integrated in Kellogg’s US Snacks manufacturing network. David Mackay, president and chief executive officer, Kellogg Company said: “This acquisition will help us expand our capacity to manufacture our snack products as well as enable new product innovations.”IndyBake Products and Brownie Products saw combined revenues of approximately $50 million in 2007.last_img read more

Bigberry goes natural

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgDevon-based Bigberry, part of Extreme Drinks, is to launch its new look smoothies, available in Pineapple & Pear, Acai & Strawberry and Raspberry & Mango varieties. They contain no artificial colourings, preservatives, stabilisers or sweeteners and are packaged in 100% recyclable 250ml bottles.Co-founder Lee Wilson said: “Bigberry smoothies are pasteurised so as to avoid the need for any ’artificial nasties’. This ensures a three to four-month ambient shelf-life, which has no negative impact on taste.”[http://www.bigberry.com]last_img read more

Packing a crunch

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgThe potential for cookies and biscuits is as vast as the imagination. Indeed, Jania Boyd, marketing manager of Macphie, a bakery ingredients manufacturer, says the possibilities are endless.They come in a mouth-watering array of sizes, shapes and flavours, from Image on Food’s saucy gingerbread Valentine’s Day designs to Marks & Spencer’s pistachio and almond flavour offerings and Greggs’ star-shaped novelty chocolate biscuits.Innovation and novelty are crucial, creating interest and driving footfall. Cookies made with chocolate dough and filled with liquid Belgian chocolate emerged last year, for example. Novelties such as cranberry and white chocolate or cookies with Smarties and spices add interest, but traditional offerings are still important and industry experts say it is perilous to ignore these.Cookies are essentially an American biscuit, or an American version of a biscuit and, as Ian Kevitt, in-store bakery buyer at The Co-operative Food, says a cookie sold in the in-store bakery is different to products that might be sold in the biscuit aisle of a supermarket. “A typical in-store bakery cookie should be soft and chewy in the centre and golden around the edges, with visible inclusions of chocolate chips or fruit pieces. Consumers in the UK would also expect a cookie to be considerably larger than a standard biscuit, he says.” Healthier optionsIn the biscuit aisle, Nick Stuart, commercial manager, at United Biscuits, says consumers are increasingly looking for healthier products that do not compromise on taste. “Whether it’s lower saturated fat, not trans fats, salt or MSG, not artificial additives or flavourings, consumers are becoming more educated and conscious of what they are eating and so the demand for natural or healthier cookies and biscuits is growing, presenting a great opportunity for bakery retailers.”Jeremy Woods, managing director at free-from bakery brand Mrs Crimble’s believes gluten-free biscuits provide an opportunity for growth. He says: “Our research shows that one in five people regularly shop from ’free-from’ counters and there is space in the mainstream market for good quality biscuits and cookies of this type.” Top merchandising tips The marketKantar Worldpanel data covering the grocery sector shows the biscuit market is now worth nearly £2.2bn. Applying average prices to NPD Group data on foodservice suggests all other channels are worth about 10% of this. Datamonitor’s latest statistics show chocolate cookies have the biggest share by value of the UK biscuit market accounting for 22%, followed by cream-filled at 14.9%, plain cookies at 9.2% and butter-based cookies at 6%. Specialist retailers, which include bakery outlets, have 3.5% of the market by value, compared with supermarkets, hypermarkets and convenience stores, which have 92.7% of the market by value between them.NPD research indicates that the afternoon accounts for the biggest number of purchases through all channels, ranging from coffee shops to retail outlets, including over bakery counters. Forty-three per cent of takings in any one day for this category through retailers take place in the afternoon. Lunch-time accounts for 17.9% of purchases through retail, and morning snacks 14.6%.TrendsBig sellers at The Co-op right now are branded cookies, which it started stocking last year, such as Smarties and Rolo cookies in packs of five. Kevitt says these appeal to existing cookie buyers, but also bring in brand loyalists to the fresh bakery category. He says products with chocolate bits perform best and milk chocolate cookies outsell other flavours. The retailer’s best-seller is its Truly Irresistible triple choc cookies and it is looking to introduce new seasonal flavours this year as part of its ’Taste the Seasons’ initiative.Gingerbread baker Image on Food is seeing an increased trend for bakery customers to stock iced biscuits throughout the year and is offering seasonal items at Easter and Mother’s Day, for example. Vhari Russell, sales and marketing executive, says: “The key to capitalising on this trend is getting the mix of product correct and achieving the right level of decoration and price to meet that market expectation.” One trend she has noticed is a move towards natural colours, which is something her own company has embraced.Lorna Culican, senior category manager, at 15-shop Lancashire-based Sayers the Bakers, says that while seasons are important, you have to have the right mix, because people still like to buy traditional products. “You need to make sure you don’t overkill seasonal stuff, because people get fed up with it. People play around with flavours, but they go back to traditional ones.”Macphie says one trend is for taking classic, retro desserts, such as lemon meringue pie, or Black Forest gateau and applying them to cookies, giving them added value and appeal to the luxury end of the market. It says a way of updating cookies is to combine them with perennial favourites, such as chocolate brownie cookies and flapjack cookies.center_img MerchandisingIn in-stores, cookies and biscuits are a great customer magnet and The Co-op’s Kevitt says it is vitally important they are visible to the customer, because they are often bought on impulse. He says merchandising in paper grab-bags conforms to shoppers’ expectations of freshness. He says the bags should also have a clear window in the front to showcase the visual appeal. “Cookies should be easy to locate within the in-store bakery area, with clearly marked pricing,” he says. The Co-op’s standard range has white packaging and its Truly Irresistible premium range, black, for easy identification.This applies to craft retail. Sayers the Bakers agrees with bagging up product so customers can multi-buy. Culican says grab-and-go packaging merchandised as a promotion pack has become more prevalent over the past year and that merchandising in the shop window is important, as well as within the shop counter, so people can see the quality.Patrick Lynch, sales manager at Grandma Wilds, which has 17 bakery outlets, and manufactures for wholesale, retail and export, says: “If you go to any supermarket bakery section, you see bags of Smartie ones, and various licensed brand names. They bake them off in the oven and you eat them in a few days.” Bake-off is the best way to sell them, he says, because of the “aroma and freshness”.Millie’s Cookies’ research suggests people are more concerned about price than a year ago, but are not willing to compromise on quality, presenting opportunities to sell premium cookies as “an affordable treat”. Michelle Graham-Clare, senior brand manager of the 113-outlet brand, says it is important to highlight the quality ingredients that people are prepared to spend more on in point-of-sale and marke-ting material.As for the future, the Co-op’s hot tip is for the whoopee pie, which is popular in US bakery outlets. Although called a pie, it is made by sandwiching two cake-like cookies together with a creamy filling. These have become increasingly available in specialist bakeries in London and, according to the Co-op, demonstrate a trend that appears to be growing. lStock a consistent range of top-sellerslUse well-known brands to attract shoppers in retaillIf selling packs, make sure they are price-marked lInclude new products that refresh the category and drive incremental saleslKnow your customer and stock what they ask forlDifferentiate your offeringlRespond to buying trendslBe flexible and offer varietylShout about your cookiesSources: United Biscuits, CSMlast_img read more

Edme offers ’Open Mill’ visits

April 21, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgA mill in Essex is throwing open its doors to the public in an attempt to improve knowledge of how local grain is manufactured.Edme Mills, in Mistley near Manningtree, is holding the event as part of National Science & Engineering Week.The ‘Open Mill’ visits will include a short talk on the science behind milling and the production of bakery ingredients, a tour of the mills and a chance for visitors to knead bread.Managing director David Amos said the company was keen to raise awareness about science and manufacturing in general. “Manufacturing is every bit as important to our national well-being as the City, arts, agricultural and public sectors. The science and engineering behind manufacturing has shaped our towns, cities and villages, and the way we lead our lives.”Edme’s products include malted wheat, barley, oat and rye flakes, malted kibbled grain, roasted malt flours and tailor-made mixes.last_img read more

IHSAA warns of social media scam

April 20, 2021 0 Comments

first_img Google+ IHSAA warns of social media scam By Network Indiana – December 19, 2020 0 290 Facebook Facebook Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSports (Photo Supplied/IHSAA) The Indiana High School Athletic Association is warning parents and fans of a scam.As every school in the state deals with restrictions on fan attendance during the pandemic, the IHSAA Champions Network says there are many social media posts promoting online broadcasts of high school basketball games that are fake, with links that contain viruses.The IHSAA says only trust links that your school provides. WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleRep. Banks joins push to oust Swalwell from House Intelligence CommitteeNext articleSuspects in deadly shooting at Waterford Glen Apartments charged with murder Network Indiana Google+ Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Press release: New review launched of press sustainability in the UK

April 20, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgNotes for Editors Recent estimates suggest that current average annual revenue per digital media user is only c.£15, compared to c.£124 per print media user: “UK News Media: an engine of original news content and democracy – A study on the economic contribution of the UK news media industry”, Deloitte, December 2016 An estimated two thirds of Local Authority Districts in the UK now not served by a local daily newspaper: “Monopolising local news: Is there an emerging local democratic deficit in the UK due to the decline of local newspapers?”, Gordon Ramsay and Martin Moore Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, May 2016 Panel members are yet to be decided and will be made up of individuals with experience in some of the core sectors under review, bringing a range of voices and expertise to the process. The review will not address politically motivated disinformation and propaganda. A summary of the review’s scope (PDF, 40.9KB, 1 page) Robust high quality journalism is important for public scrutiny and underpins democratic debate – but as print circulations decline and more readers move online, the press faces an uncertain future. This review will look at the sustainability of the national, regional and local press, how content creators are appropriately rewarded for their online creations, and ensure that the UK has a vibrant, independent and plural free press as one of the cornerstones of our public debate. The NMA welcomes this announcement today on behalf of the national, regional and local news media industry. This review acknowledges the importance of journalism in a democratic society, the vital role that the press takes in holding the powerful to account and producing verified news which informs the public. Viable business models must be found that ensure a wide variety of media are able to have a long and healthy future. Through digital platforms, news content is more widely consumed than ever before but the revenues to sustain the investment in that quality content are challenged. This review on a sustainable future is very welcome.center_img The UK has always benefited from a strong, well established and diverse press sector. However over the past decade the way in which people consume news has been transformed.Many UK newspapers have a strong online presence but falling print circulations and changes to advertising trends have caused the press sector to experience declining revenues. Latest figures show that around two thirds of local authority areas don’t have a daily local newspaper.The review will investigate the overall health of the news media, looking at the range of news available and how the press is adapting to the new digital market – including the role and impact of online platforms such as Facebook and Google, and the digital advertising supply chain.DCMS Secretary of State Matt Hancock said: A key focus of the review will be the local and regional press, who face an uncertain future. The review will also assess the operation of the digital advertising supply chain including funding flows and its role in creating or reducing value for publishers. It will also look at ‘clickbait’ and low quality news and if there is more that can be done to tackle this issue and undermine any commercial incentives associated with it.Also within the review’s remit will be an examination of how data created or owned by news publications is collected and distributed by online platforms.A panel of experts will be appointed in the coming months to lead the review.As well as identifying challenges, the review will make recommendations on what industry and government action can be taken, with a final report expected later this year.David Dinsmore, News Media Association chairman, said:last_img read more

Press release: Foreign Secretary’s Nowruz message 2018

April 20, 2021 0 Comments

Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn Email [email protected] Nowruz Mubarak to all those celebrating Nowruz in the UK and around the world. Nowruz marks the start of Spring, and a time when we look forward to the year ahead, coming together with family to celebrate new beginnings, peace and friendship So, however and wherever you are celebrating, I extend my warmest greetings to you and your loved ones and wish you a very happy New Year! Nowruz pirouz! For journalists The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: Further information Media enquiries read more