Pink Talking Fish & The Heavy Pets Storm Into Florida For Three Nights [Video/Audio]

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgPink Talking Fish, along with fellow jammers The Heavy Pets completed their run through Florida this past weekend, after making stops at Plaza Live in Orlando on Thursday, Revolution Live in Fort Lauderdale on Friday night, and the State Theater in St. Petesburg on Saturday night. Weaving classic Pink Floyd, Talking Heads and Phish, PTF secured their spot as one of the more entertaining cover bands currently on tour – playing no repeats on their entire three-night run.The band had a lineup change for the weekend, as Keith Llama from Seven Below joined in on drums while Zack Burwick was celebrating his birthday. The remaining PTF members, including Eric Gould (bass), Richard James (keys), Dave Brunyak (guitar), rocked the show in style. Check out PTF’s setlists from each night, as well as full audio from night one and full video/audio from both bands on night two.Setlist: Pink Talking Fish at Plaza Live, Orlando, FL – 5/19/16Set: Moma Dance > Breathe > Slippery People > Sand > Slippery People. Have A Cigar > Cities, You Enjoy Myself > Fearless* > You Enjoy Myself > Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together In A Cave And Grooving With A Pict > Take Me To The River > Mike’s Song > Another Brick In The Wall > Life During Wartime > Another Brick In The Wall > Weekapaug Groove > EclipseE: This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody), Rock And Roll***w/ Prince Caspian tease**w/ Jeff Lloyd, Jim Wuest, Jamie Newitt & Tony D’Amato of The Heavy Pets.Thanks to Volkemon for audio of this show.Setlist: Pink Talking Fish at Revolution Live, Fort Lauderdale, FL – 5/20/16Set: Punch You in The Eye > Psycho Killer > Money > Free > Young Lust > Free > Burning Down The House, Divided Sky > One Of These Days > Kung > One Of These Days > Divided Sky, Pull Up The Roots > Dogs > 2001 > Moon Rocks > 2001 > Dogs > Once In A Lifetime, David BowieE: Crosseyed and Painless > Your Pet Cat > Crosseyed And Painless**w/ Jeff Lloyd, Jim Wuest, Jamie Newitt, Tony D’Amato of The Heavy Pets & Alex Chafin.Thanks to CHeeSeHeaDPRoDuCTioNS for full set video and audio from this show.Full Set – Pink Talking Fish“Kavorka” – The Heavy PetsFull Set Audios Setlist: Pink Talking Fish at The State Theatre, St. Petersburg, FL – 5/21/16Set: In The Flesh > Down With Disease > Nothing But Flowers > Down With Disease, Time > Carini > Swamp > Pigs (3 Different Ones) > Halley’s Comet > Girlfriend Is Better, Any Colour You Like > Tweezer > Making Flippy Floppy* > Big Black Furry Creature From Mars > Comfortably Numb > BBFCFM, What A Day That Was, The Squirming Coil > Benny And The Jets** > The Squirming CoilE: Run Like Hell*** > Tweezer Reprise*** > Run Like Hell****w/ Rift tease**solo piano***w/ Mike Garulli, Jim Wuest, Jamie Newitt & Tony D’Amato of the Heavy Pets.last_img read more

Belá Fleck Says The Flecktones’ Future Is ‘An Open Book’

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgWith The Flecktones’ reunion tour all but imminent, the great banjoist Belá Fleck spoke about their motivation to reunite and what might come next. The new interview in JamBase touches upon Fleck’s many ongoing projects, mentioning work with Chick Corea, The Telluride Bluegrass Festival, his wife Abigail Washburn, and, of course, The Flecktones.Belá Fleck spoke about the reunion dates, explaining that it was his annual role at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival that brought them together.This lineup is a return to our original lineup: Victor Lemonte Wooten, Futureman and Howard Levy. We had planned on trying to get together in 2017, but somehow blocking a big time period wasn’t working for everyone, what with all the different projects and lives we now all have. So we scrapped the idea for that time. A little later Telluride Bluegrass Festival promoter Craig Ferguson got in touch to ask me what I wanted to do this year at the festival.I’ve played there every year since 1982, and I always try to bring something special. I knew that The Flecktones guys always loved coming to Telluride, so I thought, what about a much shorter commitment? Just a couple of weeks leading up to Telluride this time? I floated the idea, and it went over big. So we’re doing it. Who knows what it will lead to next.Of course, the follow-up question was about what it could lead to next. Fleck answers vaguely, but optimistically for fans who want to hear more.It’s an open book. We are all share a lot of history, and warmth towards each other. At a certain point we all felt ready for new challenges, and Flecktones had been the center of our musical lives for decades, so we decided to give it a break. Four years later, we’re starting to miss each other!It’s nice to hear that the band is as excited to play as we are to listen! The tour starts on June 1st, wrapping through the country and landing at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival on June 16th!last_img read more

The Stringdusters’ Jeremy Garrett Talks About The New Solo Album He Recorded In His RV

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgAs a founding member of The Infamous Stringdusters, fiddler Jeremy Garrett has found himself a key component of the fastest rising bluegrass band in recent memory. After criss-crossing the country in a relentless drive to share their music formula for happiness, the Stringdusters’ astounding live performances have earned the band a rabid following. Garrett and his band mates hew close to the traditions and aesthetics established by Bill Monroe and his contemporaries while still finding space in the songs to explore and improvise.When a bit of time opened up on the band’s touring schedule recently he decided to record the second in his series The RV Sessions, due next month. With a summer filled with packed shows, high profile slots already well under way and their own annual get down The Festy yet to come, it seemed like a good time to catch up with the fiery fiddler and get his perspective on the amazing life he’s living. Fresh home from an incredible experience playing the Lockn’ Festival, our own Rex Thomson caught up with Garrett as he recovered from his long weekend and rested up for the fun still to come before summer’s end. Check out their conversation below.L4LM: After your band The Infamous Stringdusters received a Grammy nomination, how tempting was it to start introducing yourself as “Grammy nominated artist Jeremy Garrett?”Jeremy Garrett: Well you know, it is tempting. Anytime you can gain some clout in this industry and you get a chance to step up, well that’s awesome, but I haven’t tried to utilize that too much really. Awards and all that stuff are great. Accolades can be like the pulse of your success, but I think the most important thing is how devoted you are to your artistry. No award is going to change that.L4LM: Your band is reverent in their adherence to the traditions of bluegrass, with your floating arrangements and continual passing of the lead baton. What is it about the high and lonesome sound that elicits such dedication from you?JG: It is pretty much interwoven into the fabric of my entire life. I’ve been playing bluegrass since I was really young. I started on the violin when I was three, and my dad was a bluegrass musician so I’ve always been around the Stanley Brothers sound, Bill Monroe all the way down through the different ages of bluegrass. There is just something about the integrity of bluegrass, the purity of the music, in my opinion is higher than most. What I mean by that is…to play the tradition style of bluegrass you need to have the chops to back it up. In bluegrass music, you have to to hit all the notes, but also be ready to improvise at a moments notice. There are other music forms, like jazz, that are similar. There’s something I really respect in musicians…when I see people playing at the edge of their abilities.L4LM: So you started at age three. That’s a very early age to decide what you want to do with your life, isn’t it?JG: Yeah, when you’re three you don’t really know what you want. I was probably…definitely..urged on by my parents. The fiddle I am playing now is actually 102 years old. My dad actually acquired it when he was fifteen years old, but he never played it. He played the guitar. But we always had it around. It ended up being the fiddle that I had…in a way I had it before I was born.L4LM: That is pretty wild.JG: Yeah, it was always around. It was just kind of expected that that would be the instrument I gravitated to. This particular fiddle was too big for me back then when I started, I didn’t really start playing it until I was eleven or twelve years old. It just sat in the corner of the house and honestly, I was mesmerized by it. You don’t usually know what you want at that age but things like music, they become part of you, like talking, when you start that young. It’s just an extension of who I am and what I do.L4LM: You bring up a worry of mine whenever I talk to musicians who tour with invaluable instruments like yours, with all the tales of theft and accidental destruction we’ve seen over the years. Where is the line between wanting to bring your best to a show and protecting a cherished piece of your life?JG: There’s different arguments on that. Some people will buy a really nice instrument and they won’t want to take it on the road. I tell you though…if I couldn’t take it on the plane with me…and Southwest Air is really good about that, and it’s one that I prefer to go on, I don’t know what I would do. Most of the others have been gracious about letting me bring it on. I’ve had a few problems here and there. I literally won’t get on a plane of they try and make me check it. I have a really good flight case, it’s like a coffin. I’ve had it for around twenty years now, and the thing is still solid as a brick. It takes really good care of my instrument. The thing has actually been down the Salmon River on a float trip in Idaho in three times now actually. I take care of the instrument, I keep it tuned and oiled. Mostly, it’s a work tool. It’s my voice. I prefer to have one that is perfect for me, that fits me. The set up and response of the instrument is perfectly suited for me. L4LM: As I said, it’s just a worry of mine.JG: You don’t want to sacrifice your musical integrity because your road instrument can’t perform like your studio instrument does. You could probably find another one that can do the job well enough, but nothing is ever going to beat that one. At least for me anyway. I have this instrument I’ve always played…it’s so comfortable. It’s like my voice, literally another part of my voice. It’s a part of me at this point. It’s very rare that I wouldn’t know where it is at all times. Usually it’s in some secure area onstage or backstage. I just try and be careful. I’ve been absent minded with it a few times but luckily it’s managed to stay out of harms way. L4LM: Nikki Bluhm has made a regular habit out of joining you guys for shows. Are you looking to draft her into the band full time?JG: She’s already just about an honorary member. We plan to be making music with her for a long time to come. She just fits right into our scene and our voice…she’s just so talented. It’s also great to have a female aspect to our band. We’re a bit heavy on testosterone sometimes, so it’s great to have that versatility sometimes.So…whenever it works out that we are all in the same place at the same time, we find our way to the stage together one way or another.Check out The Infamous Stringdusters being joined onstage during Jam Cruise for a rollicking “Not Fade Away” below:L4LM: The atmosphere on tour buses can get pretty rough after a few weeks, so it has got to be refreshing to add some feminine energy to that mix.AG: Yeah! Everybody behaves a little bit more.L4LM: There was plenty of feminine energy on the last album from The Infamous Stringdusters, Ladies And Gentlemen. What was your thinking behind bringing in vocalists like Lee Ann Womack, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Abigail Washburn and more?JG: It was an idea born out of the same spirit as our working with Nikki. We’ve played with some ladies in the past like Sara Watkins, Aofie O’Donovan, Sarah Jarosz and we always enjoyed that lighter touch. Everyone in the band has written a song or two that has a lighter feel than the majority of our stuff and it suits the songs. Not that all the songs done by a female singer have to be lighter, it was just more of an aspect that wouldn’t necessarily fit with our usual style.It was also time to try something different. We had all those great connections with these talented performers. We wrote a batch of songs we thought would fit and we reached out to some of the incredibly talented women we knew, and some we just wanted to work with. We’re pretty happy with the result.L4LM: Speaking of new albums, you’re getting ready to release your second solo record, The RV Sessions Vol II in a few short weeks. Nervous?JG: Not in the least. I’m more excited than anything. As an artist…throughout history…that’s what we do. We create and then release new work. What new work means in this modern era of the music industry is still up for debate though. I still feel like, at least with the type of music I make, the circles that I run in and the era I came from that the album is the quintessential distillation of where you are as an artist. It can be a definition of your sound and an extension of the direction you are trying to explore in your music. I absolutely love playing with the Stringdusters and I get a lot of creativity out that way but as an artist I have a lot more I do than I do with the Stringdusters. I play mandolin and guitar, I write a lot more songs than could ever be contained in our repertoire because we have five guys writing and singing. It can create a little bit of restlessness as an artist and I wanted to get that creativity out. The material on both RV Sessions albums are songs that I have written and love but weren’t necessarily going to be recorded by the Dusters anytime soon. This new one that is just getting ready to come out is all instrumental. I’ve never done an instrumental record, even though I have played instrumental tunes all my life. I really respect instrumental music, and in my genre, bluegrass, it is pretty common to do an instrumental record…especially, say, fifteen years ago. Players I love, like Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush and Bela Fleck, guys who have a lot of integrity and style have released incredible albums in that vein. So the RV Sessions Vol II is the culmination of my experience and thoughts on how to make that kind of record. Since I live in my RV and I travel around all the time I did all the recording actually IN my RV. I have some nice recording gear I carry with me all the time. Whenever inspiration hits I can get it down, play all the parts.L4LM: That is actually pretty smart. if you make your home your workplace you can get some pretty nice tax breaks.JG: Yeah, there are benefits to it, that’s for sure. I love the RV life. You get to travel around and see the world. And if you have the gear you can actually get some pretty good work done along the way. I have a good amount of space. Sometimes I can just leave the gear set up and roll tape whenever I am feeling creative and get it all done. L4LM: The album is instrumental, but you have a strong voice. Were you at all tempted to throw a vocal or two in there?JG: Not really. I view my fiddle playing as an extension of my voice. I feel like people in my industry wisely worry about getting pigeonholed…getting known as so-and-so who does such-and-such. It’s got to spread yourself out and balance yourself out. Maybe you’re a song writer, maybe you’re a fiddle player. This time I wanted to explore the instrumental side of things and all the different things I can do.L4LM: So you know all these amazing players and you decided to make an entire album by yourself. JG: Yeah…I narrowed all the players down to myself. In this day and age it can be hard to get all the different players together in the same place at the same time. That, and studio fees in general can cost a lot of money and you don’t always sell a lot of records and make that back. And creatively I guess I just kinda knew what I wanted. I do plan on doing more of these Session albums with some guests in the future.L4LM: Would you recommend the RV life to others…is that the case?JG: Well…it is not for everyone. But if you’re a person who likes to travel I highly recommend it. My wife and I, we grew up together in Nashville and we were high school sweethearts. We’ve been married about twenty years now and we are getting ready to have our first baby in October, so we are excited about that.L4LM: Congratulations!JG: Thanks. We grew up in Nashville and about thirteen years ago we built a house and that was a great experience. Even though we aren’t there full time anymore I still go back and visit all the time. But the western part of the country speaks to me, the climate out here, the space and the vibe just feels right to me. I wanted to be out here more but I couldn’t imagine selling my home in Nashville buying a new one anywhere. Thanks to my job I don’t really have to be in any particular city…I always travel to wherever I need to be. So my wife and I thought “Let’s just buy a RV and travel around.” That was two years ago and now we have been all around the United States and most of the national parks and a bunch of places in between.L4LM: You just played at the Lockn’ festival a couple days ago. Did you manage to have any fun at all?JG: Just a wee bit. That event is just awesome. Anytime we get to play with Keller Williams is welcome…and playing with Phil Lesh of course….all of the staff and team there killed it. It was just an amazing time for sure. Great crowd. When that stage spun around and all those people were waiting there smiling….that was really memorable. I’m still recovering from the experience, honestly.L4LM: Well, thanks for taking time out of the healing process to chat with us!JG: It was my pleasure. See you out there!last_img read more

Looking In At The Super Groups And Tributes At This Year’s Catskill Chill Festival

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgWe are so excited for this year’s Catskill Chill!With a new venue (take a virtual tour here) and a stacked lineup, 2016 has all the makings of a banner year for The Chill. Mike Gordon will be on site to headline, along with George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Greensky Bluegrass, and Lettuce. While the headliners are sure to deliver some power-packed jam, Chill’s unique collaborations and tribute sets are what sets them apart. The Chill goes above and beyond to make sure that Chillfam have a weekend that’s jam-packed with music that everyone loves, and this year is no exception.With that in mind, we put together a list of the best collaborations, jams, and tributes set up for this year’s festival. Catskill Chill is coming up in just a few short weeks, from September 23-25 (tickets available here), so don’t miss out!1. Bitches Bloom: tribute to Miles Davis’ legendary album “Bitches Brew” with Eric “Benny” Bloom (Lettuce). Featuring: Adam Deitch (Lettuce), Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce), Nigel Hall (Lettuce), Adam Smirnoff (Lettuce), Erick “Jesus” Coomes (Lettuce), and Borahm Lee (Break Science, Pretty Lights Live Band)This set is truly a dream. Eric “Benny” Bloom joined Lettuce in 2011, and since then he has taken the improvisational music scene by storm. Constantly featured as a highlight at Lettuce shows, Bloom and his battery mate Ryan Zoidis have also played with a long list of established players, constantly adding a funky element to any stage they grace. After participating in the past several super jams at Bonnaroo, Bloom will be sure bring the thunder as he pays tribute to one of his idols, the legendary Miles Davis, and possibly the most influential Jazz record of all time: Bitches Brew. This is the album where Davis introduced Jimi Hendrix-esque psychedelic guitar playing to the jazz scene, acting as a forefather for jazz fusion, so Deitch, Nigel, Shmeeans, Jesus, and Borham should feel right at home paying homage to one of their icons. Do not miss Bitches Bloom, as it’s sure to be the highlight of a weekend filled with them!2. Reed Mathis & Electric Beethoven – Reed Mathis (Billy & the Kids, Tea Leaf Green), Jay Lane (Primus, Ratdog), Todd Stoops (RAQ), Cochrane McMillan (Tea Leaf Green), and Clay Welch.This collection of musicians is about to take the world by storm. Reed Mathis, formerly of Tea Leaf Green and the Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, has been working on this project for years, pulling together some of the biggest musicians in the improvisational music scene to contribute to this “Classical Dance Music” record. Finally, Mathis is taking the project on the road, and he’s bringing Jay Lane, Todd Stoops, Cochrane McMillan, and Clay Welch along for the ride with him. Electric Beethoven will be making their East Coast debut at the Chill, and we can’t wait to see what they’re all about and which special guests might be waiting in the wings to join them.Electric Beethoven will also be appearing at this year’s Brooklyn Comes Alive festival this October 22nd, check out more info on the festival by clicking here.Watch a sneak peak of Electric Beethoven from their first ever performance on August 3rd at Terrapin Crossroads3. Dopapod + Turkuaz are… Dopakuaz!Funk yeah! The power duo of Dopapod and Turkuaz can’t seem to get enough of each other, so they’re bringing their Dopakuaz act back for another tribute set at this year’s Catskill Chill. After last year’s Studio 54 theme, the super group will focus on Yacht Rock, so get ready for all of your favorite hits from Hall & Oates, Toto, Kenny Loggins and more. We can’t wait to sing along to “Africa” with all of our friends at The Chill during Dopkuaz’s huge set!Listen to Dopakuaz crush it at last year’s Catskill Chill below.4. Elise Testone’s Tribute to Led Zeppelin – Ryan Dempsey (Twiddle), Michelangelo Carubba (Turkuaz), Danny Mayer (Eric Krasno Band), Eric Gould (Pink Talking Fish), and Matt Chase.Get ready for a whole lotta love when Elise Testone takes the stage to lead this Led Zeppelin tribute at Catskill Chill. Testone has been killing it over the past year, bringing her show-stopping vocals on the road with shows like her highly regarded tribute to Amy Winehouse. After crushing that tour, Testone prepares to tackle a whole new beast, taking over the Robert Plant role in Zeppelin, while Dempsey, Carubba, Mayer, Gould, and Chase will add some serious power to their already powerful catalog.Watch Elise Testone absolutely crush “Whole Lotta Love” from her time on American Idol below, courtesy of YouTube user sol loein.5. Pink Talking Fish and Kung Fu are… Pink Talking Fu: Prince BowieThis should be awesome! Pink Talking Fish have been taking the scene by storm with their incredible hybrid tribute fusion sets, whipping from one band to another with ease while creating a fun, cohesive set for all in attendance. Kung Fu is one of the tightest, funkiest rock bands on the scene, and Tim Palmieri can seriously shred on the guitar. Combine the two, and expect musical fireworks. Add the deep catalogs of Prince and David Bowie to the mix, and we are already lining up for a spot on the rail to see this unique collaboration in action. “Heroes” into “Kiss”, anyone?Listen to Pink Talking Fish’s cover of “1999” from Nectar’s in Burlington, VT below, and imagine Tim Palmieri up there shredding with them.6. Particle + The Werks are… PartiWerksGet ready to get down with PartiWerks. Steve Molitz and co. will join forces with The Werks to form a funky electronic dance party that we can’t wait to witness in person. Both bands are versatile, can swing from one genre to another with ease, and play incredible and fun covers, so it’ll be a sight to behold when they collaborate at Catskill Chill this September.Watch Particle cover Beck’s “E-Pro” at Bell’s Back Room in 2014 below.7. Chillfam All Stars Play Michael Jackson – Eric Gould (Pink Talking Fish), Steve Molitz (Particle), Elise Testone, Adrian Tramontano, Rob Somerville (Kung Fu), Danny Mayer (Eric Krasno Band), Rob Volo (Deep Banana Blackout), Shira Elias (Turkuaz), and Chris Brouwers (Turkuaz)Chillfam, get ready for your All Stars! The festival has put together an excellent group of musicians to pay tribute to Michael Jackson, with Eric Gould of Pink Talking Fish, Steve Molitz of Particle, and Elise Testone all on the bill, as well as Danny Mayer of Eric Krasno Band and both Adrian Tramontano and Rob Somerville from Kung Fu holding down the rhythm section. Add in the fiery vocals of Shira Elias and horn playing from Rob Volo and Chis Brouwers, and you’ve got a great show in the works. With Jackson’s deep catalog to play with, the sky is the limit for this one-time-only performance.7. Roosevelt Collier’s NY Get Down – Roosevelt Collier, Eli Winderman and Rob Compa (Dopapod) + Michelangelo Carubba and Taylor Shell (Turkuaz).This set has all the makings of a classic Catskill Chill set. Chillfam legends Eli and Rob from Dopapod and Michelangelo and Taylor Shell from Turkuaz will join forces to form the ultimate backing band for the incredible Roosevelt Collier. Collier is an absolute force on the lap pedal steel guitar, and his prowess is sure to be a perfect fit for this super funky tribute to New York.9. ShwizZ and FiKus return as… ShwiKus: Tribute to the BeatlesChillfam know that it’s not a true Catskill Chill without a wild collaboration between festival favorites ShwizZ and FiKus teaming up for a unique collaboration. his year, they’ll be paying homage to the Beatles, and expectations couldn’t be higher for ShwiKus’ annual team-up at The Chill. ShiwiKus is the Walrus! Goo goo g’joob.10. Michelangelo Carubba’s Sunday Sauce – Nicky Cassarino (The Nth Power), Roosevelt Collier, Steve Molitz (Particle), Nate Edgar (The Nth Power)This set will be a true barnburner in the VIP tent. Michaelangelo Carubba from Turkuaz will be leading the way, and he recruited Nicky and Nate from The Nth Power, Roosevelt Coolier, and Steve Molitz for one of the most unique offerings at the festival. “Sunday Sauce” doesn’t give us too much knowledge on what they’ll be playing, but, if Michelangelo’s annual birthday party at The Hall At MP was any indication, fun covers, obscure funk tracks and a whole lot of smiles as Carubba leads the band through a set of fun material.11. The Heavy Pets’ Tribute To The 80sThe Heavy Pets performed this tribute to the 80’s at AURA Music Festival back in March, and it absolutely crushed. Opening with “Electric Avenue”, the band moved through several 80’s tracks like “1999”, “Everybody Wants to Rule The World”, “I Ran”, and “Rock The Casbah”. This set of fun covers should be an excellent fit for Chill’s vibe, and we can’t wait for The Heavy Pets to bring their tribute up north for what’s sure to be a top musical moment of the weekend.Listen to The Heavy Pets Tribute to the 80s from AURA Festival below.We can’t wait for this year’s Catskill Chill! Head here for tickets, and check out the full lineup posted below.last_img read more

Greensky Bluegrass & Leftover Salmon Decide To Merge Competing Shows For The Love Of Music

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgFans in Louisville, KY were looking at a very difficult decision next Thursday, September 15th, as both Greensky Bluegrass and Leftover Salmon were performing at different venues in the city on the same night. Though both bands are routed through unique fall tours, the intersection certainly posed some dilemmas for fans who have been loyal followers of both artists.Fortunately, these two bands have deep ties, and even recently performed on the same bill at Red Rocks Amphitheatre earlier this year. The two groups have lovingly decided to merge their two performances, keeping the jamgrass flowing at the Mercury Ballroom for this special billing. Cereus Bright will support both bands.According to the GSBG announcement, all tickets purchased for Leftover Salmon will be honored at the Mercury, and refunds will be issued to all those who can no longer make it. With both Greensky and Salmon on the same bill, Louisville bluegrass fans have no excuse to miss this show! More information can be found here.last_img read more

Stream Dawes’ New Album “We’re All Gonna Die” Now

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgAmericana rockers Dawes have a new album coming out next week, and we are really pumped to hear the band’s newest music. Luckily, you can stream it right here, right now!Thanks to NPR Music, the album, entitled We’re All Gonna Die, is now available to stream in its entirety, which we’ve included below for your listening pleasure.We’re All Gonna Die will be available for physical and digital purchase next week on Friday, September 16th. Enjoy the new Dawes album, in full, below.last_img read more

Elephant Revival’s Bonnie Paine Discusses The Interconnected Depth Of Her Music

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgThe ethereal voice of Bonnie Paine is one of the most instantly recognizable pieces of the musical experience that is Elephant Revival. Her multi-octave range and haunting, hushed tones is complimented by her skill on a wide variety of percussive and bowed instruments, from the washboard to cello and many points between. Her performance skills, when joined with that of fiddle player Bridget Law, guitarist Daniel Rodriguez, bassist Dango Rose and banjo/pedal steel player Charlie Rose, play a brand of music often described as “Transcendental Folk.”Of all her contributions to the band’s unique and dynamic sound, the most important is her songwriting. Recently Paine revealed that many of her songs from throughout the band’s career have been part of a long and winding tale of a lost child and the sea. Water, in all its many forms, has been at the heart of many of her tunes, from “Drop” to the banks of Oregon’s “Rogue River.”Our own Rex Thomson had a chance to catch up with the elusive Ms. Paine as she prepared with the rest of the band for their upcoming show with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. In the interview, Paine shares the poignant tale uniting many of her songs, her joy at seeing the sold out crowd at the band’s first headlining Red Rocks performance and her excitement at hearing the band’s material fleshed out with a full compliment of amazing musicians. You can read the full conversation below; enjoy!Live For Live Music: This has been a pretty crazy year for you. You narrowly escaped a bus fire, released a fabulous new album, sold out Red Rocks as the headliner and next weekend you are playing with the Denver Symphony. Is this the wildest year of your life?Bonnie Paine: Maybe so, actually, when you put it that way. Yeah, we have had some adventures this year, all different kinds. And there is still more to come!L4LM: Well,rather than focus on the bad, let’s talk about the good for a moment. What was it like, playing to a full house at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre?BP:  That was amazing. It was incredible to look and and see so many faces of people we love in such a beautiful space. That was magical.Someone filmed it in 3-D and I got to look at it. It was awesome. You can look any direction you want to when you put these goggles on. I saw myself, then I turned and saw my dad and mom, then I looked back and saw myself onstage and recognized the first moment I saw them in the crowd. It was a trip.L4LM: Was it weird to see yourself from so many different angles?BP: I try not to focus too much on how I look when I play. I usually don’t look too much at myself. That can be a bad idea for me. I don’t know too many people who like looking at themselves.L4LM: You released a new album, Petals, that seemed to touch on some heavier subjects than in the past with some new, densely layered instrumentation. Are you happy with the final product?BP: I’m very happy. It was very different. It was an exploration of sound. We tried to add a lot of new flavors. We had Charlie Rose with his pedal steel, for the first time. That was a new flavor.It was also the first album I played the cello on. I’ve written songs on the cello for years, but I usually ended up playing percussion instead.  These songs had some cello parts that were really powerful, and that was fun. We got some big drum sounds in there, which was new for us. It has been fun to play with our new percussionist who is touring with us, so it makes it really fun.L4LM: So how many instruments do you play regularly.BP: I don’t know. I mean… does the washboard count?L4LM: You’re playing it with musical intent, so of course.BP: Well, then seven or so.L4LM: You said you have written songs on the cello for years. Is there a formula to how you go about writing your songs?BP:  Generally my songs begin with a melody in my head when I am out walking around. Usually these melodies pop into my mind when I am outside of human made areas. Out in the woods, down by a river. From the melody I will find words that fit over the rhythm of that melody.Some are really fun to find the chords for initially, because it is in the same register as my voice. So I can find the notes that way. Sometimes it comes from trying to mimic a bird’s voice on the cello. Sometimes I am just strumming guitar chords until something speak to me..or stomping around…chanting a bit maybe?L4LM: You mentioned your new touring percussionist, Darren Garvey. How are you enjoying having more help keeping the beat going?BP: He’s amazing. We have known Darren since our first gigs really.  We met him at the Stage Stop in Rollinsville, Colorado when the band first got together. Its fun. My sisters were all in town this one time, really early in our beginnings, when we were playing at the Stage Stop. We all hung out basically as our band was forming and had a blast. It is really impressive to see a percussionist as dialed in he was and is.The best thing about playing with him is understanding. I know where he is going. It’s like when I play with my sisters. I’m not wondering about where he is going or trying to make sure what I am playing matches what he is playing. I told him “Playing with you is just like playing with my sisters, which is a compliment.”It’s very natural to play with him. He has a great groove and an open heart.L4LM: Did you add a percussionist to take some of your duties, and, if so, are you just going to add five or six more people?BP: No, I don’t think so. But he is also a multi-instrumentalist, like everybody in the band. There’s room for so many kinds of flavors on these instruments. It is fun for sure.L4LM: Over the last year or so, you have introduced certain songs from throughout Elephant Revival’s existence as part of a longer running story. Can you help us understand what you are trying to create?BP: Yeah, a lot of my songs are related. Some of them I have discovered this after they were written, in a way, that they were all a part of the same story. Now I am writing for it a little more intentionally to fill out the story.The first song that I ever wrote is called “Currach,” which is on our first album. It is about being taken on a boat and getting lost. It is the story of a little boy who ends up in a little boat and gets washed out to sea.  Shortly after that I was babysitting for my friends and I wrote the next part of the cycle, and that’s “Furthest Shore” which is on Petals, the album we just released.That is the story of the boy after he has grown up and the adventures he has. Then there is “Stolen,” also on Petals, where he gets picked up by a slave ship and has to overthrow the slave driver. Its a long, long story; that is just a small piece of it.So the short version is there are thirteen songs now that are part of that story. My mom is writing it for me, because she is a great writer. The dream is to have an acrobatic ballet made from it someday, played with a symphony, along with the music.Listen to Elephant Revival perform a beautiful rendition of “Stolen” from the Wonder Ballroom in Portland, Oregon in April of this year:L4LM: So there are thirteen songs written for this already?BP: Maybe more, I’m still finding ways things fit together. There are going to be two separate albums I’m realizing, and two separate plays or ballets made from it. The first one is nearly completed. There is just one and a half songs missing that tell the last chunk of that part of the story.The second half… I should probably start that today. I’m starting to realize that other songs are a part of it. Like the raven character, it’s just become really apparent to me that it is a part of it. It has turned up in a couple of songs now. Those songs are actually making more sense to me now.The raven’s part in it is definitely more of the second half of the story.L4LM: Another thing that seems to connect a majority of the songs you write is the element water. Is that on purpose as well?BP: Yeah, absolutely. I look for water places everywhere we go if I have time. Those are the easiest places, when I am writing, to let it flow, so to speak. I listen for melodies in the water. Whether it’s the way streams bubble, or the river rushes or the ocean ebbs and falls or rain falls…there are patterns that you can hear that can repeat themselves.It can be come a melody that is ingrained in your surroundings, and it is something a lot of people can relate to. I want to draw from those places when I am writing because it is something everyone can relate to. And water is life.Water is the main ingredient for any type of creativity, the creation of life.Here’s one of Elephant Revival’s most well known songs about water, the thought provoking “Drop.”L4LM: The effect your music has on audiences is impressive. Elephant Revival has been known to literally mesmerize crowds with your lush and immersive songs. Do you subscribe to the idea that music is emotion distilled?BP:  Yes, that is one of my favorite things about music. before there are words there is an initial reaction going on. It’s funny, I haven’t been able to put this thought into word yet and it is about hesitating to put things into words. It is about taking time to experience things first, and music is an accepted form of that.We put so much into words, human words, and language as a species. It’s a beautiful thing and I love language, but I think it separates us from the rest of the natural word that we are part of, and I think it isolates us from the rest of living world that surrounds us that is not human. Language is the only form of communication that we are willing to accept most of the time, with the exception of music and art.Those are things that go beyond the sounds that only a human can make. Music and art goes beyond that to visions and taps into sensations and feelings that are shared between each other. It taps into that bigger communication that is going on that we forget to acknowledge in the world every day. We need to remember and acknowledge that it is not just our species in the world. Does that make sense?L4LM: It does, and that is a very pure goal for a musician to have. If there is a story behind your work is there an emotional core to the songs you write?BP: At times, but I try to not get too honed in on in trying to impart something specific because you never know what someone is needing. Music is medicine for a lot of people, at least for me. So I wouldn’t want to limit what somebody might be able to take away from the song. Everybody has their own filter.If there was one thing that I wanted to have some kind of impact with listeners, it is to stay connected, to remember that they are part of something. I think disharmony and suffering are from some element of separation. We need to remember that we are inextricably part of this whole thing, together.See Bonnie, Bridget and Daniel help make for a couple of friends at their impromptu Northwest String Summit Wedding below:L4LM: We just ran an interview with Leftover Salmon’s Vince Herman and he had some nice things to say about you and your band. Earlier this year we interviewed your Elephant Revival bandmate Daniel Rodriguez and he spoke of the effect Herman had on you guys during your time living near him. Did Herman have a big impact on you as well?BP: Absolutely, yeah. Oh man, I love that guy so much. Dan and I had moved to Colorado and we were staying in a rough neighborhood. We were staying in the Stage Stop actually and Vince called us there. And he said “Hey, I got a place for you to live. And it was the house right next to him.”We were neighbors for a couple of years there in Nederland. Vince is an interesting kind of wizard. He was so welcoming and so warm. I guess I got it in my head that it could be hard to be so well known in such a small town. I don’t know that I ever wanted anything like that.But he was just so graceful with it. He continued to love everybody. There were boundaries to it so he could still maintain a person life, but he was so welcoming, so inviting, so loving. He would come over and knock on our door and say “Breakfast is ready!” He would make us these amazing meals.Sometimes he would bring a parade into our living room and then have us join him to go marching through the town. I sure learned a lot about combining fun and music. He is definitely the master of combining fun with music.Check out our chat with Vince Herman, the legend himself, right here.L4LM: Next weekend you will be blending your music with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. As the rehearsal process goes on how are you finding the results?BP: It’s amazing. I don’t know how to explain it, but we’re just finding all this emotional depth to the songs. The current songs especially and the songs from the cycle. All of those were written imagining this kind of instrumentation in mind. And bringing in an element of Cirque De Soleil to it, for the play.These songs were written with this kind of that kind of production in mind and this is all, this is my dream starting to be realized. For me, it’s like, “Wow! I am really going to do this!” It’s pretty exciting to complete this big dream as I traveled from the place I started in Oklahoma.It is also amazing to work with such talented players. We’ve only had one rehearsal with them so far. We are going to have another right before we play with them at Boettcher Hall, which they sound amazing in. It is a huge, gorgeous room. It was designed for them.Just hearing them tune up before we start to play makes me cry. It’s magic. It’s the culmination of so many forces coming together to do the same thing. All the different parts and tonalities coming together, working in harmony to create something. That is what we need right now, more harmony.That is the sensation at the heart of it that is so moving to me. Their parts, separately, sound like they have Tourette’s Syndrome or something. The orchestras are all different and some of them have very dramatic interpretations of the song. It’s incredible.When you hear the trumpet player practicing his part by himself it sounds weird. But when the other horns come in and weave their way through it and the strings flow in and outward it all makes sense. It is such a beautiful symbol of what we are all a part of, and a big part of what we need in these times.L4LM: Thanks for taking some time out of your obviously busy preparations to talk with us. Good luck at the show; we are looking forward to hearing what comes from your hard work!BP: Thanks. And I just want to say we really love you and appreciate you and your work Rex. I’m gonna go practice my new cello right now!We’ll leave you with one last song from Elephant Revival’s newest album, Petals, the strident “When I Fall”, performed at the Hoxeyville Music Festival.last_img read more

Gov’t Mule Debuts Pearl Jam Cover & More At Capitol Theatre Closer [Video/Photo]

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgOn Saturday night, Gov’t Mule rounded out their two-night run at Port Chester, NY rock palace, The Capitol Theatre. The performance saw the band work in a heavy helping of material from their latest release, last year’s Revolution Come, Revolution Go…, including a “Traveling Tune” opener that came full circle with a reprise of the tune to close the second set. In between, the band put together yet another top-notch performance filled with soulful, rocking Mule favorites, creative tease-filled jams, and even the surprise live debut of Pearl Jam‘s “Come Back”. You can also check out a clip of the end of “Mr. High & Mighty” and the beginning of “Come Back” below via YouTube user btragal:Gov’t Mule – “Mr. High & Mighty”, “Come Back” (Pearl Jam) [Partial]Warren Haynes, Matt Abts, Danny Louis, and Jorgen Carlsson will continue their ongoing spring 2018 tour this evening, Sunday, April 29th at the Paramount Theatre in Asbury Park, New Jersey as part of the Asbury Park Music & Film Festival. For a full list of Gov’t Mule’s upcoming tour dates, you can head over to the band’s website.Setlist: Gov’t Mule | The Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 4/28/18Set One: Traveling Tune > Railroad Boy > Mule > Beautifully Broken, Stone Cold Rage, Drawn That Way, Forsaken Savior, Whisper In Your Soul, Little Toy Brain, Funny Little TragedySet Two: Life Before Insanity, Thorns Of Life, Trane > Eternity’s Breath, Pressure Under Fire, Revolution Come, Revolution Go, Unring The Bell, Endless Parade, Mr. High & Mighty, Come Back, Inside Outside Woman Blues #3, World Boss, Bring On The Music > Traveling Tune RepriseEncore: I’ll Be The OneNOTES: Forsaken Savior contained a “Sad and Deep” (Dave Mason) tease. Funny Little Tragedy contained a “Message In A Bottle” (The Police) tease; Eternity’s Breath (Mahavishnu Orchestra cover) contained a St. Stephen (Grateful Dead) jam; I’ll Be The One contained a “Blue Sky” (Allman Brothers Band) teaseGov’t Mule | The Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 4/28/18 | Photos: Eric Gettler Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Phish Releases First-Ever Full-Show “Tweezer” Sandwich On LivePhish.com

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgToday, Phish shared a new archival release of their 9/18/99 show at Coors Amphitheatre in Chula Vista, CA. With the band’s fourth-ever “Tweezer” show opener, sandwiching impressive first set jams, a saucy 20+ minute “Boogie On Reggae Woman” second set opener, a crowd-sourced “Meatstick”, 15+ minute “Harry Hood, and more between the “Tweezer Reprise” closer in the second encore slot, the ’99 Chula Vista show is certainly work revisiting. In fact, it’s the band’s first-ever full show Tweezer Sandwich.Read the notes from LivePhish.com below:Starting in the Pacific Northwest (including Boise) in what was technically still summer, Phish’s fall 1999 tour landed at Shoreline for two shows. After Shoreline, the tour followed the lines going south more than eight hours to San Diego for a show the very next day. Coors Amphitheatre, as it was originally named, is a scenic 20,500 seat amphitheatre built on a former dairy farm near San Diego and opened in 1998. Saturday, September 18th was the eighth show of fall tour and the first Phish show in Chula Vista.The band rewarded those who traveled down to Chula Vista with a Tweezer opener that blew the leaves right off the palm trees. The fourth-ever Tweezer show opener (first since Island Tour) led to more Set I highlights like a hot Wilson > Maze and a deep grooving Tube > Rocky Top to end set I. In a mighty display of openers, set II launched straight into the stratosphere with a supersized Boogie On Reggae Woman. Next came the syrupy funk of Meatstick > Free, giving the Southern California crowd a chance to join the latest Phish dance craze. Set II continued with a dripping psychedelic Harry Hood, and a Contact > Tweezer Reprise encore that cemented Chula Vista 1999’s place in Phish history as the first-ever full-show Tweezer Sandwich.– During Meatstick, the band brought members of the audience onstage to help teach the West Coast crowd the Meatstick dance– Recorded by Paul Languedoc– Post-Production by Kevin Shapiro– Mastered by Fred Kevorkian at Kevorkian MasteringPurchase Phish’s 9/18/99 Coors Amphitheatre, Chula Vista, CA show here, or stream it on the LivePhish app.Setlist: Phish | Coors Amphitheatre | Chula Vista, CA | 9/18/99SET 1: Tweezer, Roses Are Free > Wilson > Maze, Brian and Robert, Tube > Rocky TopSET 2: Boogie On Reggae Woman, Meatstick > Free > Bouncing Around the Room, Harry Hood > Frankenstein > CavernENCORE: Contact > Tweezer Reprise[Wilson contained a How High the Moon tease from Mike and Hood contained Stash teases from Trey. Trey brought a fan onstage from the crowd to help teach the Meatstick dance.]last_img read more

Pink Talking Fish Announces 2018 Fall Tour Including Giant Country Horns Collaborations

March 2, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgToday, Pink Talking Fish has announced the dates for their extensive upcoming fall tour, which will see the band joined by The Giant Country Horns during their two-night Colorado run. The multi-band tribute act, which blends the music of Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, and Phish in a high-octane musical cocktail, also has a number of dates on the calendar, with the tour spanning from the end of August through mid-December.The beginning of their fall tour finds Pink Talking Fish running through a number of previously announced festival appearances, including Boston’s Rock On! Concert Cruise (8/31), New York’s Adirondack Independence Music Festival (9/2), Massachusetts’ Wormtown Music Festival (9/14–16), Ohio’s Resonance Music & Arts Festival, and Massachusetts’ Spirit Of Shrewsbury Fall Festival (9/29).The band’s headlining club performances begin in earnest on October 3rd at South Carolina’s Charleston Pour House. This first show in Charleston kicks off a four-night run across the South that spans till October 6th, with stops in Charlotte, NC; Atlanta, GA; and Asheville, NC. Next, the band heads to the mid-Atlantic, moving through Pennsylvania, Virginia, and North Carolina before heading to California on October 24th for an appearance at Solana Beach’s Belly Up followed by a performance at Hangtown Music Festival. Briefly returning to the East Coast on October 27th, Pink Talking Fish rounds out their October dates in Asbury Park, New Jersey, for “Convention Hell” at Convention Hall—a special concept show during which the band will specifically pay tribute to Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon.Pink Talking Fish will head to Las Vegas at the start of November to complete their previously announced Halloween run at Vinyl Las Vegas. These shows will serve as late-night Phish afterparties with distinct concepts for each performance. On November 1st, Pink Talking Fish will perform their “PTF Is Bowie” concept—which combines the music of Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, Phish, and David Bowie—in celebration of Phish’s David Bowie musical costume during their 2016 Halloween experience. On November 2nd, Pink Talking Fish will commemorate the 20-year anniversary of Phish’s impromptu performance of Dark Side Of The Moon.The band picks up their fall tour on November 21st, hitting Hartford, Connecticut’s Infinity Music Hall & Bistro before continuing on to Portland, Maine’s Aura on the 23rd. A stop in Buffalo, New York, on November 28th precedes a performance at Detroit’s The Magic Bag and a two-night run at Columbus, Ohio’s Woodlands Tavern on November 30th and December 1st. From there, Pink Talking Fish heads to Colorado, where the group will join forces with The Giant Country Horns—the famed horn section that joined Phish during the Vermont quartet’s 1991 summer tour—during shows in Fort Collins and Denver on December 6th and 7th. Finally, to close out their fall tour, Pink Talking Fish rounds things out with a show in Chicago on the 14th and Pittsburgh on the 15th.For more information and ticketing, head to Pink Talking Fish’s website here.last_img read more