EIA: U.S. coal production expected to fall by 72 million tons in 2019

December 31, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgEIA: U.S. coal production expected to fall by 72 million tons in 2019 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):The federal government’s short-term outlook on energy once again trimmed expectations for future coal production from the U.S.U.S. coal production decreased by about 19 million tons, or 2%, to 756 million tons in 2018 compared to the prior year, the U.S. Energy Information Administration wrote in its April short-term energy outlook. Coal production is forecast to continue to fall as domestic consumption and export demand are expected to decline through 2020.More than 7 GW of coal-fired generation is expected to retire by the end of 2020, contributing to a wave of recent retirements as electricity generators transition to other fuels. Coal production is expected to decline 9% to 684 million tons in 2019 before falling another 6% to 640 million tons in 2020. The forecast numbers are already significantly lower than the EIA’s March forecast when the outlook suggested coal production would fall to 695 million tons in 2019 before declining to 664 million tons in 2020.About 10% of U.S. coal-fired generation will be retired between 2018 and 2023, Moody’s Investors Service wrote in a January note to investors, adding that recent policy actions are not enough to reverse that trend.“Export opportunities for U.S. coal producers support free cash flow generation at least through 2019, but will diminish in the medium term,” the Moody’s note said. “U.S. coal producers’ export economics depend on relatively high pricing and would be much less profitable in an environment of lower prices, since they are far from their export markets.”The EIA forecast that exports of metallurgical and steam coal will decline in 2019 and 2020.More ($): EIA’s monthly energy outlook trims near-term coal production forecast againlast_img read more

GE looks to 3D printing to build next generation of taller, less costly wind turbines

December 31, 2020 0 Comments

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Verge:GE announced today that it’s developing skyscraper-sized wind turbines with massive 3D-printed bases. The conglomerate plans to work with partners in the construction industry to produce both a printer and materials that could eventually be deployed around the world.Taller turbines can capitalize on stronger winds at higher altitudes, and the structures support larger blades that generate more power. But building bigger turbines makes transporting the pieces needed to put it together a logistical nightmare. GE hopes to 3D print the base of a turbine wherever they want to place it, so that they won’t need to haul around such a gigantic hunk of concrete or steel. The company says its onshore turbines could reach up to 200 meters tall, which is taller than the Seattle Space Needle and more than double the average height for wind turbines in the U.S. today.Onshore wind turbines have had a massive growth spurt since the 1980s, when they averaged a height of about 20 meters in the US — not counting the blades. Under ideal conditions, those earlier turbines had a maximum output of about 100kW per turbine. By 2017, those numbers grew to 84 meters tall with an output of more than 2MW (2000kW). Turbines in parts of Europe, where there aren’t as strong winds closer to the ground, can reach greater heights. One of the tallest onshore turbines, in Gaildorf, Germany, towers 178 meters tall. GE wants to go even bigger.Since it’s one of the world’s largest manufacturers of wind turbines, GE could usher in a whole new era for wind turbines design and construction. But it won’t be the first company to look into 3D-printing for wind energy. Startup RCAM Technologies, with $1.25 million in funding from the California Energy Commission, set out in 2017 to build two turbine towers in a similar fashion — their research is still ongoing. That means GE could be the first to make wind turbines with a 3D-printed base commercially available. The company completed its first prototype in October 2019, and it plans to begin production in 2023.“What you’re looking at is a technology that enables the industry to go to a new level,” says Paul Veers, chief engineer at the National Wind Technology Center and a senior research fellow at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, of 3D printing. The new technology could potentially reduce the amount of time and labor needed to install turbines, especially onshore, where turbines tend to be smaller than their offshore counterparts (it’s easier to transport materials by sea). “It’s a stepping stone into the next generation of wind plants,” says Veers.GE believes it can build a 160-meter tall, 5MW turbine that generates 33 percent more power yearly than a turbine half the size — at a “significant” cost savings. And since it’s usually easier to transport a 3D-printer than a 100 to 200 meter tower, it will be able to bring renewable wind energy to new markets, the company tells The Verge. It would cut down the greenhouse gas emissions coming from transporting giant structures too.[Justine Calma]More: GE will make taller wind turbines using 3D-printing GE looks to 3D printing to build next generation of taller, less costly wind turbineslast_img read more

Reliance chairman says India on path to renewable energy transition in next few decades

December 31, 2020 0 Comments

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:India will fully move away from fossil fuels to renewable energy in the next few decades, the chairman of Reliance Industries, operator of the world’s biggest refining complex, said on Monday.Reliance, which operates two giant refineries with a combined capacity of 1.4 million barrels per day in western India, aims to become a net zero carbon company by 2035.“India is in the right mindset to completely, in the next few decades, move away from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Be Atmanirbhar (self dependent),” Mukesh Ambani said at a book launch event on Monday.India, the world’s third biggest oil importer and consumer, ships in about 80% of its oil needs.Reliance Group, which works across the oil, telecom and retail sectors, aims to build up a mix of clean and affordable energy with hydrogen, wind, solar, fuel cells and battery power, Ambani told shareholders earlier this year.[Nidhi Verma]More: Reliance says India will fully shift to renewable energy in next few decades Reliance chairman says India on path to renewable energy transition in next few decadeslast_img read more

A Special Treat

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgClick here to subscribe to the Pharr Out BlogHey y’all,When Brew and I REALLY indulge ourselves – like buying a soda or ice cream cone, we call our extravagance a “special treat.” Yesterday was our one-month wedding anniversary (yes, we keep track and yes, we celebrated it… for better or worse we are THAT couple) and it was full of special treats.The day started much like any other; I woke up at 5:30 AM, rolled over, kissed my husband adios and was off hiking before 6. About 3 hours into my morning hike I had a VERY special treat that I had been waiting on for a long time. I was a few miles from the VT/MA border when I heard something ahead of me on the trail. I looked up and- much to my surprise- saw a bear 30 yards away, my first bear ever on the East Coast. My initial thought was, “BEAR!!!” But then the more logical and conditioned side of my brain quickly chimed in: “No way. You’ve hiked over 5,000 miles on the East Coast and lived here your whole life and never seen a bear. You’re banned from bear sightings on this side of the Mississippi!” Then the two sides of my brain conferred through an intuitive checklist: Black? Check. Furry? Check. Rather large yet stalky? Check. Big, chubby ears? Check. (For some reason the ears were really important and this animal definitely had bear ears.) So yes, with requirements met, I decided that I was in fact staring at a bear. Then the creature spotted me, and bolted deep into the woods. But it was too late! I had seen it! I had spotted a bear! Yessss…!!!My next special treat of the morning came from entering a new state. Not a state of mind, mind you, but a literal state. That is, I crossed the border from Vermont to Massachusetts. I love Massachusetts because it brings on a slew of short states that you can hike across in 2 to 3 days and feel like you’re making real progress.When I finally reached the pre-appointed road, I ran into my husband’s arms and told him about the morning excitement (Yes, I literally ran into his arms and yes, I do it at every road crossing). Usually for lunch I grab some peanut butter and a banana, sit down for 10 minutes, then walk on, but on this day Brew had picked up a special anniversary lunch- a Subway sandwich! I love Subway! Some people are haters. In fact, I had to turn Brew onto the sandwich chain; but I say if you don’t like it, it’s your own fault… I mean you create your own meal – you’re your own Sandwich Artist, for goodness sake. And without prior guidelines, Brew had created a masterpiece.After lunch I climbed up Mount Greylock and Brew started up the mountain with me. Usually you can get water on top of the mountain at the lodge, but this summer all services at the summit are closed for renovations. Brew didn’t want me worrying about water, so before he hiked back to the car, he ran to a water source three-fourths of a mile off the trail to fill up my bottle. Talk about chivalry.Now I must have some kind of homing device that sets off rain clouds as I get close to the summit of Greylock. When I was a mile from the top, the sky opened up and I had to hike in a complete downpour. Unlike my ‘05 hike, though, there was no thunder or lightning or marble sized hail pelting me. And that in itself was a special treat.I met Brew that evening in Cheshire, MA. We found a place to sleep and shower before going out for pizza and ice cream. And when we got back to the tentsite while we were brushing our teeth, Brew discovered that his Vaseline jar had spilled all over his backpack. While he was cleaning things up, he had the nerve to laugh at me and say I “looked like Pocahontas” with my hair parted in the middle and my headlamp over it. He might have gotten the better of me if he hadn’t spit toothpaste into his beard then laughed so forcefully that he farted super-loud. But then that brought me to tears, and the tears blinded me and caused me to hit my head on the doorframe, which turned my tears of laughter into tears of pain and confusion. (This entire episode took place in about 2 minutes, sans alcohol. Amazing, eh?)Clearly, it was time for us to bring this day to a close. We ended it just how we began: in our tent lying beside each other. My favorite and best special treat of the trip is having Brew here to support me and share in this experience. Here’s to a great first month, and many more down the trail.last_img read more

Cole Subaru Crying Wolf Challenge

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgRace DetailsWhen: May 19, 2013Where: Bluefield, W.Va.What: Cross Country Mountain Bike Race, 6-18 milesStart time: 1 pmRace size: 60-150Website: http://www.cryingwolfchallenge.comThe Crying Wolf Challenge XC Mountain Bike Race is part of the West Virginia Point Series and the Virginia Off-Road Series  It is an annual event which takes place along the border of both states at Bluefield City Park. The CWC will be held on May 19th, 2013. There are four levels of competition that constitute the event including a kids race at noon! The main race begins at 1:00PM.The three categories which identify rider experience of the challenge are:BeginnersSportExpertMore than just a race! The Crying Wolf Challenge is an event created to promote tourism and outdoor recreational activities such as cycling, camping and hiking! Come out and join us this year.RACE CONTACTJoe [email protected]last_img read more

When to Speak Up When You See Danger on the River

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgDear Mountain Mama,Last weekend I watched a couple with their dog getting into a flat-bottom canoe without air bags. I wondered whether they mostly paddled flatter sections of the river upstream. I debated whether to say something about the danger posed by paddling without float bags. I decided against it.Later that day we came across the same group after their boat had capsized. We helped them get their canoe and gear to shore. They told us that their dog was probably already on the bank, waiting for them.When we righted their boat, we discovered that the dog hadn’t swum to shore. She had gotten trapped underneath the canoe. Despite our best efforts to resuscitate her, she was gone.I feel partially to blame. Am I?Yours,Didn’t Dare to Speak——————————————————————————Dear Didn’t Dare to Speak,What a tremendous weight to carry around. The blame game is dangerous to play. The what-ifs and could-have-beens are too many to speculate. And no matter how long you linger in the feeling-guilty-space, you will never know if events might have unfolded differently had you said something.Didn’t Dare to Speak, all we can do is learn from the past. And we can all learn to do better the next time around.Once I too was at a put-in and saw something that made me want to say something. There was a father and his two children, both under ten. Nobody was wearing a helmet as they started rafting down the Class III stretch of whitewater. A feeling welled up deep in side of me, a truth that begged to be voice. But instead, I told myself, don’t meddle, you’re just starting to paddle. What do you know about rafting anyway?Not an hour I looked into that father’s eyes as he held the body of his nine-year old daughter. The raft had rapped on a rock, she alone had fallen out, and hit her head. His eyes met mine with a bewildered, hollow look. I would have traded a million times over the mind-your-own-business glare that he might have given me at the put-in, had I said his children should wear helmets.We are all connected, more than we even imagine. Loss ripples through us, and all of us grieve. Because of our humanity, we have a right to share our concerns for one another. That kind of caring is at the very essence of our humanity. Be part of what makes the river community so strong by daring to speak when you see danger on the river.Best,Mountain Mamalast_img read more

Clips of the Week: Strider Shredder, Southern Snowboarding, and Hank Patterson

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgOur favorite outdoor videos from around the internet for the week that was:1. Strider ShredderOk, so this kid isn’t exactly on a Strider, just like every tissue isn’t a Kleenex, but this video of a 3-year-old crushing the bike park on a mini-bike with no pedals in priceless. He also takes some licks near the end, but powers through like a champ.2. What Would Hank Do?Grizzlies in tutus, three legged dogs, salmon being struck by lightning; just another day in the life of world-renowned fly fishing expert and guide, Hank Patterson.3. Shredding the SouthThis video may be a little long for the internet’s attention span, but the full length version of The Appalachian Project is worth your time. The vid follows the East’s best riders as they shred parks, urban features, and even powder up and down the Appalachians from North Carolina to New York and everything in between. Get pumped for the ski season, it’ll be here before you know it.The Appalachian Project from Appalachian Boarder on Vimeo.last_img read more

BRO-TV: Day on the Trail

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgOn May 1st, Leah and I joined forces with the folks over at Visit Southern West Virginia to host a hike on one of West Virginia’s many fabulous trails. The Grandview section of the park was our destination, and with sunny skies, cool weather, and a great group of folks, we couldn’t have asked for a better time! The Grandview Rim Trail overlooks the New River, and there are awesome overlook platforms along the way that make for great photo opps! The trail is partly shaded by rhododendron and mountain laurel, making it a great destination when the plants are in bloom.To top off the hike, the wonderful team over at The Dish Cafe in Daniels, W.Va., met us at the end to prepare a delicious lunch: polenta cakes, grass-fed burgers, and salad with homemade dressing. Delicious! Thanks guys! We’ll be back for those avocado brownies 😉The view of the New River from Grandview Rim Trail.The view of the New River from Grandview Rim Trail.Looking to the horizon.Looking to the horizon.Me (left) Leah (right) rockin' the selfie.Me (left) Leah (right) rockin’ the selfie.IMG_8372Another view of the New River from a Grandview Rim overlook.The whole gang!The whole gang!The fabulous Leah on a fabulous day.The fabulous Leah on a fabulous day. last_img read more

Katadyn: Making Water Drinking Water

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgKatadyn has been in the business of water filtration since the 1930’s.They control over 50 percent of the water filter market worldwide with products ranging from industrial and municipal water supplies down to your personal water bottle. Their products can remove particulate matter, bacteria, and even desalinate water, and their personal pumps see use all over the globe. It’s no surprise then that we had high expectations for their Base Camp MicroFilter when it showed up at our office.Katadyn_GearThe first thing we noticed when we looked at the Base Camp was the well constructed bag the components came in. It’s an attractive black Nylon affair with two loops on either side to allow secure stowing options, with a sturdy black zipper. Inside we found a folded 6 Liter Bag with a port at the bottom and top folding bar, a filter attachment, a combination shower and output attachment, and an output hose and filter cleaner.Katadyn_Beach2We decided the best way to test out our new toy was to take it down to our local Rivanna River and see how it did in the real world. We chose a bend with easily access to both fast flowing and slow flowing water and got down to business. Filling the bag was as easy as screwing in the right attachment to the bag’s port, and dragging it through the water until it was filled.Once it was filled we folded the top of the bag down using the folding bar at the top, and searched for a low hanging branch sturdy enough to hold the bag. Which is where we ran into a problem. There weren’t any.Katadyn_FullSix liters weighs a little over 11 pounds, and since we were short on low lying tree limbs we had to hold it up with our arms for the 12 minutes it took for the bag to empty. It’s also worth noting that it’s not possible to switch out attachments to the bottom of the bag when full due to the inability to seal the top of the bag. Neither of these issues are large, but something to be aware of.In the end the only thing that matters is, does it work, and the short answer is a resounding YES. The filtered water had no trace of grain and tasted great, compared to the unfiltered river water. Two thumbs up as far as the filter is concerned.Speaking of the filter, cleaning it was a breeze. We removed the filter protector from the corrugated filter proper and simply used the provided sponge to remove what visible particles there were. All the other parts of the assembly were equally easy to clean with water and soap.Katadyn_CleaningIn the end we really like this product. It has just the right amount of capacity for a small group of people to fill their water bottles, or an individual to take a shower in the woods. We’re looking forward to taking it with us on our next long hike.Pros:1. Great Filtration of both particles and bacteria2. Plenty of Capacity for a group or personal shower3. Simplicity of operation is idiot proofCons:1. The top’s not 100-percent water tight, so it requires a friend or tree branch to use correctlyVerdict:GET IT!–Editor’s Note: We sincerely hope Blue Ridge Outdoors intern Wil Geyer does not get giardia from this very thorough product test; but we do appreciate his excellent writing and hard work.last_img read more

Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Towns Nominee: Shepherdstown, West Virginia

December 30, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgSteeped in history, Shepherdstown is West Virginia’s oldest city, but in relatively recent years it’s become a hub for the arts and an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise. One factor that makes the town so endearing to outdoor enthusiasts is its quick and easy access to the C&O Canal Tow Path. Originally constructed to enable horses to tow coal and other goods down the canal toward market, the C&O now serves as a 185 miles bike path connecting Cumberland, Maryland to Washington, D.C. From Shepherdstown you can hop on the C&O, and, within a few miles, find yourself at one of its unique, biker-only campsites.In addition to its bike-friendly nature, Shepherdstown is also situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, and easy paddling access to the Potomac can be obtained via the Princess Street boat ramp.Cudas_IB_0814_2Did you know? This area is home to the annual Run Through History 10K, which traverses a scenic path through the historic Antietam National Battlefield.Vote now at blueridgeoutdoors.com!last_img read more