Laser remote makes watching TV even lazier

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first_imgIn the Remote-Touch concept, the user points a laser at the screen and selects an option. A transparent substrate with tiny pyramid-shaped indents reflects the light to photodetectors on the edges of the screen, which determine the laser’s position and the user’s selection. Image credit: Pasquariello, et al. As researchers Donato Pasquariello, Gilles Vissenberg, and Galileo Destura explain in a recent issue of the Journal of Display Technology, the laser pointer takes advantage of the intuitiveness of a touchscreen display, but with a longer range. The team is from the Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.The system, called “Remote-Touch,” involves three main components: the laser pointer, a micro-structured substrate that fits over the display, and position-sensitive photodetectors at the edge of the display. “The main advantage is that it is easier and more intuitive to point at objects on the screen, instead of scrolling through a menu via buttons on a remote control or via a mouse or joystick,” Vissenberg told PhysOrg.com.When a user wants to change a setting, they point the laser at one of the objects on the screen. Placed over the screen is a transparent substrate made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with small pyramid-shaped indentations on the backside of the substrate. The pyramids, which have a base of about 50 x 50 micrometers, are designed to “capture” part of the incoming laser beam when a user “clicks” on certain points. “The signal for the selection-click can be sent by a conventional remote control signal and then be linked to the coordinates of the laser pointer, or it can be incorporated by a modulation in the laser pointer signal itself,” Vissenberg explained.Then, the four facets of the pyramids reflect the light in four directions: up, down, left, and right. Position-sensitive photodetectors (PSDs) located at the edges of the display detect the light at the appropriate x- and y-coordinates, determining which object on the screen was pointed at. The output of the PSD is directly linked to the TV chip. Or, if used to remotely control a computer, the laser pointer coordinates could be used as mouse coordinates, Vissenberg explained.The researchers built a prototype of the remote-touch feature on a 21” LCD screen, using a laser pointer with a wavelength of 780 nanometers for pointing. They also developed a correction method for laser beams that were aimed at the screen from a wide angle, enabling the method to work accurately even when viewers were sitting off to the side of the screen.The group hopes that this technique could offer an inexpensive alternative to touchscreen and other control techniques. The most commonly used touchscreen technology, called resistive touchscreen, is limited to a maximum screen size of 21”. The only option for larger screens is infrared touchscreen technology, which is very expensive. Because of its low-cost materials, the Remote-Touch concept could offer an inexpensive alternative to conventional touchscreens of any size. More information: Pasquariello, Donato, Vissenberg, M. C. J. M., and Destura, Galileo June. “Remote-Touch: A Laser Input User-Display Interaction Technology.” Journal of Display Technology, Vol. 4, No. 1, March 2008.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Modern-day remote controls can be complicated. But, thankfully, researchers are making TV the relaxing, mindless pastime that it was always intended to be with a new easy-to-use remote control. The controller is a laser pointer, which can be pointed at different options on a TV screen or other large display to control volume, channels, and make other selections. Citation: Laser remote makes watching TV even lazier (2008, March 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-03-laser-remote-tv-lazier.html Mini-projector offers up tablet and wall whiteboard views This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Spin polarization achieved in room temperature silicon

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first_img NRL scientists demonstrate efficient electrical spin injection into silicon Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — A group in The Netherlands has achieved a first: injection of spin-polarized electrons in silicon at room temperature. This has previously been observed only at extremely low temperatures, and the achievement brings spintronic devices using silicon as a semiconductor a step closer. Citation: Spin polarization achieved in room temperature silicon (2009, November 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-11-polarization-room-temperature-silicon.htmlcenter_img Spintronics, or spin electronics, is an emerging field of electronics that aims to be able to represent digital information by using the spin of electrons as well as their charge. When fully developed, spintronic devices could profoundly change data storage devices, computer architecture and so on, and they could reduce energy use to ultra-low levels.Electrons are basically a two-state system with their spins either “up” or “down”. For a spintronics device to work, it must have a system (the spin injector) that produces a spin-polarized electric current, which has more of its electrons in one spin state than the other. It also needs a spin detector that can detect whether the electrons are up or down.In metallic systems spin polarization is generally achieved by passing an electric current through a ferromagnet. (It is magnetic because the electrons within it are polarized, and as they pass from the magnet to the metal they remain polarized for a short time.) Spin polarization has also been achieved at room temperature in ferromagnetic semiconductors such as manganese-doped gallium arsenide.Until recently spin polarization in non-magnetic semiconductors like silicon has only been achieved at temperatures of 150 K, but new research has achieved spin polarization at ambient temperature. Scientists Saroj P. Dash and colleagues at the MESA Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente in The Netherlands used a single nickel-iron electrode on top of silicon, with a layer of aluminum oxide between them. When they applied a current to the electrode they observed a “puddle” of electrons in the silicon, which could then be dissipated by applying a magnetic field. This caused an observable voltage drop across the contact.As a control they inserted a layer of ytterbium between the electrode and the aluminum oxide, since ytterbium is known to destroy spin polarization. When the current and magnetic field were applied, no voltage drop was observed, which indicates that spin polarized electrons had caused the effect.Spintronics could eventually lead to extremely low energy use devices, and perhaps ultimately to quantum computers. More research is needed to prove the spin-polarized currents really flow through the silicon, and it may still be several years before the promised ultra-low power devices are developed.The research was published yesterday in the journal, Nature.More information: Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature, Nature 462, 491-494 (26 November 2009), doi:10.1038/nature08570© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Study shows manure from cows not given antibiotics still causes increase in

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first_imgPseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture on an Xylose Lysine Sodium Deoxycholate (XLD) agar plate. Credit: CDC/public domain Antibiotics in manure a far-reaching impact on abundance of human pathogenic bacteria in soils Giving livestock antibiotics has allowed farmers to produce a huge amount of meat in relatively small areas, increasing production and profits. But, some contend, it’s also contributed to the problem of bacteria becoming more resistant to drugs dedicated to fighting infections in people. Some have also suggested that using manure from cows given antibiotics as a fertilizer, very likely makes the problem even worse. In this new effort, the researchers sought to find out if that is true.It was a simple exercise, the team fertilized one patch of ground with manure from cows that never were given antibiotics, and another patch with a nitrogen based inorganic fertilizer. Two weeks later they came back and tested the soil for bacteria levels. To their surprise they found that the soil that had been treated with the manure still had a lot more resistant bacteria (those with genes that caused the production of the enzyme β-lactamases) in it than the patch that had been inorganically treated. Further testing revealed that the increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria came from the soil, not the cows. Thus, there was something about the presence of the manure that caused living organisms in the soil to behave differently.The researchers can’t say for sure why the manure caused more resistant bacteria to show up in the soil but suggest it’s possible that heavy metals from the manure or other nutrients could make the soil friendlier to the types of resistant bacteria that are naturally in soils. Such bacteria have naturally developed resistance to antibacterial agents from fungi and even other bacteria. The researchers plan to continue their research to find out the true cause.In the meantime, it’s likely that those who have been suggesting that manure from cows given antibacterial agents causes problems, will suggest that because “clean” manure also causes an increase in the amount of resistant bacteria, its likely cows given antibiotics would make the problem even worse. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Bloom of resident antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil following manure fertilization, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1409836111AbstractThe increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global threat to public health. Agricultural use of antibiotics is believed to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance, but the mechanisms by which many agricultural practices influence resistance remain obscure. Although manure from dairy farms is a common soil amendment in crop production, its impact on the soil microbiome and resistome is not known. To gain insight into this impact, we cultured bacteria from soil before and at 10 time points after application of manure from cows that had not received antibiotic treatment. Soil treated with manure contained a higher abundance of β-lactam–resistant bacteria than soil treated with inorganic fertilizer. Functional metagenomics identified β-lactam–resistance genes in treated and untreated soil, and indicated that the higher frequency of resistant bacteria in manure-amended soil was attributable to enrichment of resident soil bacteria that harbor β-lactamases. Quantitative PCR indicated that manure treatment enriched the blaCEP-04 gene, which is highly similar (96%) to a gene found previously in a Pseudomonas sp. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the abundance of Pseudomonas spp. increased in manure-amended soil. Populations of other soil bacteria that commonly harbor β-lactamases, including Janthinobacterium sp. and Psychrobacter pulmonis, also increased in response to manure treatment. These results indicate that manure amendment induced a bloom of certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil that was independent of antibiotic exposure of the cows from which the manure was derived. Our data illustrate the unintended consequences that can result from agricultural practices, and demonstrate the need for empirical analysis of the agroecosystem. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Citation: Study shows manure from cows not given antibiotics still causes increase in resistant bacteria in soil (2014, October 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-manure-cows-antibiotics-resistant-bacteria.html (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working out of Yale University has found that soil treated with cow manure from cows that never received antibiotics, still had more resistant bacteria in it than soil treated with nonorganic fertilizer. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their study and offers some theories regarding their results.last_img read more

Increase in ocean acidification could lead to lost fish larvae in quiet

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first_img © 2016 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers has found evidence that suggests that as the oceans acidify due to increased carbon dioxide levels, some fish larvae may become lost while looking for a home. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Tullio Rossi, Ivan Nagelkerken, Jennifer Pistevos and Sean Connell, all with The University of Adelaide describe their study of a natural environment that mimics oceans of the future and their experiments with larvae exposed to increased acidification levels This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Biology Letters Citation: Increase in ocean acidification could lead to lost fish larvae in quiet reefs (2016, January 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-ocean-acidification-lost-fish-larvae.html Explore furthercenter_img A school of sardines in Italy. Credit: Wikimedia / Alessandro Duci Many studies have been done with the goal of better understanding what will happen in the ocean as acidification occurs, but few if any have looked into the possible impact due to changes in sound dispersal. Prior research has shown that fish larval dispersion and then the subsequent finding of a home, is tied very closely to sound—marine life living on a coral reef makes a lot of noise and can serve as a beacon. Fish larvae have evolved an ability to use the noise to find their way home after riding currents for days, weeks or months. But, the researchers wondered, what will happen if the reefs become quieter due to the existence of less marine life in a more acidic ocean?To find out, they ventured first to an undersea carbon dioxide vent off the coast of New Zealand where acidification levels are close to what many believe will become the norm over the next hundred years—they sank microphones and recorded underwater sounds and found that there was much less natural noise than in nearby areas where acidification levels were normal. That suggested that an increase in acidification would indeed mean a quieter underwater world.Next, the researchers went back to their lab and tested mulloway fish larvae responding to changes in acidification—first they exposed a test group to high levels of carbon dioxide for nearly a month, then they put them in a tank to see if they would make their way using acoustic cues, to what should be their natural environment. They did not, they instead avoided them—larvae reared in a normal environment responded positively, as expected. The team also tried putting the damaged larvae in a tank where the conditions were similar to that around the natural carbon dioxide vent and found that they tried to avoid that environment as well. Their simple experiments indicate, the team suggests, that some fish larvae in the future might have to find another way home, or perish. More information: Lost at sea: ocean acidification undermines larval fish orientation via altered hearing and marine soundscape modification, Published 13 January 2016.DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0937 , http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/12/1/20150937AbstractThe dispersal of larvae and their settlement to suitable habitat is fundamental to the replenishment of marine populations and the communities in which they live. Sound plays an important role in this process because for larvae of various species, it acts as an orientational cue towards suitable settlement habitat. Because marine sounds are largely of biological origin, they not only carry information about the location of potential habitat, but also information about the quality of habitat. While ocean acidification is known to affect a wide range of marine organisms and processes, its effect on marine soundscapes and its reception by navigating oceanic larvae remains unknown. Here, we show that ocean acidification causes a switch in role of present-day soundscapes from attractor to repellent in the auditory preferences in a temperate larval fish. Using natural CO2 vents as analogues of future ocean conditions, we further reveal that ocean acidification can impact marine soundscapes by profoundly diminishing their biological sound production. An altered soundscape poorer in biological cues indirectly penalizes oceanic larvae at settlement stage because both control and CO2-treated fish larvae showed lack of any response to such future soundscapes. These indirect and direct effects of ocean acidification put at risk the complex processes of larval dispersal and settlement. Baby fish will be lost at sea in acidified oceanslast_img read more

Cavitands enhance selectivity and hydrolysis rate of one ester on a longchain

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first_img Explore further A challenge for chemists is trying to selectivity react one of two identical functional groups on the same molecule. For example, a diester with a long carbon chain in between the two ester groups has two chemically equivalent sites. Hydrolysis of this diester results in a mixture of products where one or both of the esters are converted to carboxylic acids. This results in lower overall yields. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. MIDA boronates react via two different mechanisms © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Cavitands enhance selectivity and hydrolysis rate of one ester on a long-chain diester (2016, August 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-cavitands-hydrolysis-ester-long-chain-diester.html New research by Qixun Shi, Matthew P. Mower, Donna G. Blackmond, and Julius Rebek, Jr. of Fudan University and Scripps Research Institute describe the use of cavitands as a way to overcome the monofunctionalization problem. They found that cavitands force a long-chain α,ω-dimethyl ester to fold onto itself changing the molecule’s behavior compared to bulk solution. The cavitand results in greater selectivity and reaction rates for both the acid and base hydrolysis of diesters. Their work appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.While there are ways to functionalize one of two identical functional groups on a molecule, these methods rely on there being some difference between the two functional groups. But, in the case of multi-carbon diesters, these procedures do not work because the functional groups are so far apart from each other that they essentially behave as two reactants (i.e., they have equivalent rate constants). One possible solution is to entrap the long-chain reactant within a molecular container causing the reactant to fold in a particular fashion. This is similar to how the body entraps a peptide chain in a chaperone protein during protein synthesis or how enzymes will catalyze an otherwise difficult reaction by causing a guest molecule to fold into a conformation that buries some of the reactive sites.Cavitands are macrocyclic molecules shaped like a cup. The lip of the cup has functional groups that serve to broaden the rim and prevent dimerization. The chemical composition within the cavity as well as the cavity’s shape promotes guest folding into a particular conformation. In the current research, the authors found that the α,ω-dimethyl ester guest folded into a J-shape, with one end outside of the cup while the other end remains within the cup. This allowed for both acid promoted and base-promoted (i.e., saponification) hydrolysis of only one end of the ester.Using NMR to follow the reaction process, Shi, et al. first tested acid hydrolysis using DCl added to D2O in a solution containing diester and the cavitand. One end of the ester is deep within the cavitand while the other is accessible for hydrolysis. Once one end is hydrolyzed the other ester is rendered less reactive; however, because the J-shape conformation is dynamic, some of the other end of the diester does hydrolyze. The yield for the monoester product is still significantly greater than in bulk solution based on rate data.Kinetic studies using NMR peak integration of the acid hydrolysis reaction indicate that the ester portion of the molecule remains suppressed within the cavitand three-fourths of the time. The reaction rate is more than a factor of ten greater than the comparable reaction in bulk solution. The authors suggest that this may be due to better solvation of the exposed ester. With the organic molecule-cavitand complex, the reaction can be carried out in water. Without the cavitand, the acid hydrolysis reaction requires the addition of an organic co-solvent.The saponification reaction demonstrated even better selectivity and enhanced reaction rates compared to the acid hydrolysis reaction. The major product was monester with <5% of the product as diester or diacid. NMR analysis showed this exceptional selectivity has to do with phase transfer. In both the acid hydrolysis and saponification reactions, the cavitand allows the organic diester to react in an aqueous solvent. However, the difference between the two is that in the saponification reaction a monoanion is formed (RCOO-). The monoanion/cavitand complex then precipitates out of solution resulting in greater yields.From this research, the authors have demonstrated that confined molecules behave differently than in bulk solution and this can be exploited for synthetic conundrums such as monofunctionalization of seemingly equivalent functional groups. The conformation of the guest molecule is guided predominantly by the shape of the cavitand, although chemical properties, such as hydrophobicity, do play a role. While the cavitand is difficult to modify, Dr. Julius Rebek points out that the cavitand used in this study is useful for other monofunctionalization reactions. More information: Qixun Shi et al, Water-soluble cavitands promote hydrolyses of long-chain diesters, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1610006113 Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Scienceslast_img read more

Genome study offers clues about history of big cats

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first_img(Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers has conducted a genetic analysis and comparison of the world’s biggest cats to learn more about their history. In their paper published on the open source site Science Advances, the team describes their work mapping the genome of the jaguar and comparing the results with other big cats. One surprise they found was that the big cats have all engaged in cross-breeding multiple times over the course of their history, and because of that, have evolved new features that have proved useful in other areas. They suspect, for example, that the jaguar, which has the strongest bite of all the big cats, found itself with a larger head after breeding with lions—that may have led to a bite strength increase, which made it possible for them to hunt better protected animals in the New World. Jaguar individual, called ‘Vagalume’ (‘Firefly’ in Portuguese), whose genome was sequenced. Credit: Rodrigo Teixeira Species tree of the genus Panthera estimated from genome-wide data. All five extant species are represented as follows: lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), jaguar (Panthera onca), snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and tiger (Panthera tigris). Numbers above branches indicate the estimated age [in million years ago (Ma)] of the adjacent node, averaged across all genomic windows (100-kb window size, 100-kb steps) that conform to the species tree (95% highest posterior density interval below the respective branch). Colored rectangles on terminal branches indicate phenotypic categories affected by species-specific episodes of positive selection. Credit: Figueiró et al., Sci. Adv. 2017;3: e1700299 The jaguar is the largest wild cat in the Americas, and as the researchers note, it is also in danger of becoming extinct. While some of the reasons for the rapid decline in jaguar populations are obvious, others are not so clear. That is why the team embarked on a five-year mission to study the animals hoping to learn how to save them.One of the avenues of research involved mapping the genome of the jaguar—such mapping for other big cats had already been done. That allowed the researchers to compare markers between cats belonging to the genus Panthera, which, in addition to jaguars, also includes tigers, lions, snow leopards and regular leopards. Also, because so much genetic work has been done on the common house cat, they, too, were included in the study.The researchers report that they found over 13,000 genes that were similar through all of the species included in the study. They also found that the cats all diverged from a single ancestor approximately 4.6 million years ago—one that was apparently most like the modern leopard. The team also found that all of the species populations have also declined over the past 300,000 years, which means lower genetic diversity. Explore further Scientists say the American lion is not a lion after allcenter_img More information: Henrique V. Figueiró et al. Genome-wide signatures of complex introgression and adaptive evolution in the big cats, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700299AbstractThe great cats of the genus Panthera comprise a recent radiation whose evolutionary history is poorly understood. Their rapid diversification poses challenges to resolving their phylogeny while offering opportunities to investigate the historical dynamics of adaptive divergence. We report the sequence, de novo assembly, and annotation of the jaguar (Panthera onca) genome, a novel genome sequence for the leopard (Panthera pardus), and comparative analyses encompassing all living Panthera species. Demographic reconstructions indicated that all of these species have experienced variable episodes of population decline during the Pleistocene, ultimately leading to small effective sizes in present-day genomes. We observed pervasive genealogical discordance across Panthera genomes, caused by both incomplete lineage sorting and complex patterns of historical interspecific hybridization. We identified multiple signatures of species-specific positive selection, affecting genes involved in craniofacial and limb development, protein metabolism, hypoxia, reproduction, pigmentation, and sensory perception. There was remarkable concordance in pathways enriched in genomic segments implicated in interspecies introgression and in positive selection, suggesting that these processes were connected. We tested this hypothesis by developing exome capture probes targeting ~19,000 Panthera genes and applying them to 30 wild-caught jaguars. We found at least two genes (DOCK3 and COL4A5, both related to optic nerve development) bearing significant signatures of interspecies introgression and within-species positive selection. These findings indicate that post-speciation admixture has contributed genetic material that facilitated the adaptive evolution of big cat lineages. Journal information: Science Advances © 2017 Phys.org Citation: Genome study offers clues about history of big cats (2017, July 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-genome-clues-history-big-cats.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

On a Punjab kind of high

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first_imgThe traditional classical music of Punjab with its characteristic ‘Kheyal bandishes’ wooed the classical music lovers of Delhi as veteran singers Balwant Singh Namdhari and B S Narang opened the two-day festival with heart warming performances.Presented by Delhi government’s Department of Art, Culture & Languages and the Punjabi Academy, the festival was inaugurated by Chief Minister of Delhi, Sheila Dikshit and presided over by Minister of Education, Languages, Social Welfare, Child and Women Development, Prof Kiran Walia. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The ‘Festival of Traditional Music of Punjab’ that will end on Sunday has brought together some of the most respected names in Punjabi classical music.Punjab has always been renowned for its beautiful bandishes or compositions which have enriched the repertoire of Hindustani classical music. The music is enriched by the words of Shah Sada Rang and Ada Rang, the eminent music composers and artists of the 18th century Mughal era.’We are really happy to put together this festival that will showcase Punjabi Kheyal compositions that have been sung by Hindustani musicians, whether from Punjab or elsewhere, over the last two centuries. It is our effort through this festival to revive an interest in them by encouraging their research and presentation,’ said Rawail Singh, Secretary, Punjabi Academy. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIt is worth noting that Punjabi is the only other language apart from Brajbhasha in which Kheyal bandishes have been written over the centuries. Shah Sada Rang and Ada Rang, creators of the Kheyal style of Hindustani classical music, have composed some beautiful bandishes in Punjabi which will be presented in this Festival. Sada Rang was the pen name of renowned Hindustani music composer Niyamat Khan, who served in the court of Mughal ruler Muhammad Shah, who was a great patron of arts. Sada Rang, along with his nephew Ada Rang is created with transforming the Kheyal style of Hindustani music through their compositions. Veteran Punjabi classical singers from Pakistan Ustad Badar-uz-Zaman and Ustad Qamar-uz-Zaman brought alive the Pakistani tradition of the art of Punjabi Kheyal music on the last day of the festival of Punjabi classical music in the national capital. Eminent Punjabi vocalist from India Nivedita Singh gave the Zaman brothers good company as the trio enthralled the Delhi audience with their renditions.The Delhi Administration established the Punjabi Academy in September, 1981 to propagate and promote Punjabi language, literature and culture as an integral part of composite culture of Union Territory of Delhi. Ever since its inception, the Academy has been playing a catalytic role in the proliferation of Punjabi literary and cultural activities, in the spheres of music, folk dances, seminars, symposia, short story, poetry, novel, literary criticism, drama etc. during the last two decades, the Academy has assumed a significant role and status of premier organization in the field of Punjabi language, literature and culture. Department of Art, Culture and Language (Government of Delhi) is the administrative department of Punjabi Academy.last_img read more

Showcasing Indias soft power

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first_imgCapturing myriad colours of India, India is a web based initiative of the Public Diplomacy Division of the Ministry of External Affairs, released five short films produced by Anurag Kashyap, Monday evening. The five films that represent the essence of 21st century India through its youth will be available on Youtube alongwith the  other films curated from all over the world. Portraying India’s love for cricket, Hidden Cricket by Shlok Sharma, was screened amidst an august gathering comprising, the Minister of External Affairs, Salman Khurshid; the renowned filmmaker, Anurag Kashyap, and other dignitaries.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Democratising the idea of film-making, this online platform seeks to represent the virtues, culture and the spirit of India, to engage a global audience. In its two years long run, it invited amateur and professional artistes from all over the world to describe the idea of India. The Public Diplomacy Division’s campaign has been a call for imagination to complete the thought, ‘India is’, to share one’s vision of India.From a manhole to the window panes of buildings, how a cricket ball takes over an entire cityscape makes for a crisp and entertaining experience in Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix Hidden Cricket. It encapsulates the idea of a cricket crazy nation by ending bang on with the note: ‘That’s how we play’. The other four films are : Geek Out by Vasan Bala, Moi Murjani by Anubhati Kashyap, Epiphany by Neeraj and Chai by Geetanjali Rao. With an underlying idea of India, the four delve into various subjects: Geek out dwells on the existence of our alter ego in the age of internet; Moi Murjani brings you a slice of life of a spirited independent mother from Patiala; Epiphany is a journey of a separated  couple with a twist, and Chai is a riveting montage of different people making tea while sharing a part of their history. Speaking on the occasion, Kashyap said, ‘All I had to do was, round up all these creative people in my office and ask them to go back to  where they came from.’ He commended the young filmmakers who came across as five different personalities celebrating the diversity of India through their work. ‘This wave of digital cinema and internet has changed the way things worked.  With no pressure of recovering money from this venture, their creative energies have got a huge backing’, added Kashyap in a note of thanks to the ministry and its partners. He cited the example of Geetanjali Rao, who had won three critics’ week award at Cannes for her film Printed Rainbow back in 2006, to emphasise how important it is to give an impetus to such directors.  ‘We are at a cusp of change as we are moving towards a demographically young India. Through democratic efforts, we can try and find the best answers to the conflicts faced by our nation,’ said Salman Khurshid, while awarding the winners of ‘India is’- global video challenge 2012 at the ceremony. In his closing remarks, he applauded the celebration of Indian youth by saying, ‘ India is, is a wonderful way of saying that India is and nothing more needs to be added to it’.last_img read more

The power of she

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first_imgYa Devi sarva-bhuteshu, Shakti rupena sansthita. The Sanskrit shloka encapsulates: The Omnipresent Goddess is the embodiment of Power. Sharmistha Dutta’s photography exhibition being hosted at The Gallery on MG is a three week long exhibition, celebrating the latest works from her collection – Durga. The exhibition is also being supported by Sulabh International, a renowned social organization that fights against social injustices and gender biases in India. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Sharmistha Dutta, an experienced photographer, a proficient designer and art director will be showcasing her solo photography exhibition starting this Women’s Day on the 8th of March. Her collection of photographs highlights the emergence of women in India comparing them with the deity Durga – A dynamic power house to overcome the evils of the rural society of India.About her exhibition she elaborates, ‘For the initial accumulation of the story I have travelled to Delhi, Kolkata, Varanasi and spent a lot of time researching and shooting in Vrindavan. My soul purpose for this exhibition is to create awareness about the violence faced by the widows of India. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixI want to generate public attention towards their vulnerability and thereby help raise their social acceptability. I believe it’s not just the people living in rural India who treat their widows and women badly, but it’s a practice that is also shockingly prevalent amongst the educated people living in the big cities. It’s a mindset that we need to fight and change.’At the forefront of this significant social reform is Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, Founder of Sulabh who in less than two years, he has done much towards the welfare and upliftment of the women of Vrindavan and has been able to transform the lives of these women. Where once there were tears of pain and a wish to die, there’s now a smile on their faces and a desire to live. Apart from healthcare and nutrition, Sulabh also provides education and vocational training.WHEN: 8 to 28 March, 11 am to 7 pm everydayWHERE: The Gallery on MGlast_img read more

CESC witnesses huge hike in power consumption

August 31, 2019 0 Comments

first_imgKolkata: The enthusiasm and excitement generated by football World Cup at distant Russia has influenced the demand map of power consumption during the night in CESC area.On Friday (June 15), midnight demand touched 1976 MW, which is 3.65 percent higher than last year and 1919 MW on Saturday (June 16), which is 1.21 percent higher than last year.According to observers, the excitement of football World Cup is keeping the football enthusiasts awake before their television sets. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIn many cases, it is an all-family affair where even friends and neighbours are joining. An analysis of the trend indicates that the unusual heat is also a contributory factor with electrical fans and AC machines infull swing.Assuring consumers of a trouble-free power supply both during day and night, a company spokesperson said CESCis ready to meet the demands of consumers both during the day and night. The CESC generating stations are in full swing and no shortage of supply is apprehended. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedA spokesperson confirmed that the surge in midnight demand has led to a marginal increase in temporary faults and 500 strong CESC restoration team has successfully restored the marginal faults.CESC has successfully responded to rising telephone calls and this alert will continue as long as it is necessary.The maximum demand handled by CESC in the last two days were: 2099 MW and 1919 MW. The maximum demand up to 4:15 pm on Sunday was down to 1487 MW because of holidays, although midnight power demands on Sunday-Monday midnight is expected to be around 1750 MW.last_img read more