It never rained

January 26, 2021 0 Comments

first_imgROCKPORT, Mass. – Last January, I got a phone call from my mom, Jane, that I never could have expected. “Meghan, how do I ask a guy if he wants to go on a date?” My parents got divorced eight years ago, but never had my mom liked a guy enough to make the first move – that is, until David came along. David is a tall, sweet, handsome father from the heart of Revere, Mass. His daughter attended the same dance school as my sister, Erin, and my mom noticed how gentle and attentive David was with his three kids whenever she went to pick up Erin after class. “How do I let him know that I’m interested?” Welcome to the club, Mom. “Ask him out!” I suggested. So, she did. They got coffee, started to date, fell in love and were engaged within a year. I take all the credit. And this weekend, my mom and David finally made it official. After my boyfriend, Anthony, and I landed in Boston, we set straight to work. We only had three days to pull off the outdoor wedding from scratch. After spending Friday and Saturday crossing things off our checklists and reuniting with family members, the big day finally arrived. The wedding was held at The Yankee Clipper Inn in Rockport, Mass. It’s a colorful port town near Gloucester, the city known for “The Perfect Storm.” It was a foggy, cool day and the Clipper is an eight-bedroom inn perched right on the harbor’s rocky shore. The inn was like something on a postcard. I, however, felt as if the low-hanging clouds, at any moment, would condense into rain and ruin the outdoor ceremony. The happy couple was supposed to say their vows right on the edge of the lawn, under an arch that Anthony and I had decorated. I prayed that the downpour would hold off for at least a little while. “It’s not going to rain,” Anthony reassured me. “At least just wait until the ceremony is over,” I bargained with the elements. “Just until we can get under the tents.” This was my J-Lo “Wedding Planner” dream come true, except I was also a co-maid of honor with my sister, and I had the best team I could have asked for. They say it takes a village, but they hadn’t seen my family and friends in action yet. We stowed the bride in her room to get ready, hung the garland, laid out the tablecloths, set up the dance floor, moved in the band, put the finishing touches on the flowers and directed guests to their seats. The patio and tables were covered in hydrangeas spray-painted the right color at the last minute by my brilliant friend and florist, who pulled an all-nighter to finish his job at the bakery and still arrange all our flowers and bouquets. Our neighbor of 18 years made a gorgeous, three-tiered chocolate and buttercream frosting cake covered in icing seashells. My sister’s prom date brought his band to serenade us through the night, her French teacher took professional photos and a family from church served as the catering company. The bridesmaids, my sister and my future stepsisters, all wore soft pink and sea green dresses they picked out themselves, while my future stepbrother and his dad wore suits and white roses for boutonnières. Most importantly of all, my mom positively glowed in a tea-length white frock with sheer polka-dotted tulle. Everything and everyone came together perfectly. The band was warming up, my mother was blushing, I had the wedding ring and I was ready to finally call David, Dan, Analise and Ysabelle my family. My mom only looked like she was going to cry once, while her brother walked her down the aisle. But she made it through the vows, and I could see love made perfect in David’s eyes as he promised himself to my mother. The rest of the night was a blur. Relieved and ecstatic, we partied until the sun went down. I couldn’t thank everyone enough for how much they did for my mom and David. As crazy and hectic these past few months have been coordinating and planning and re-checking all the lists and reservations, each small contribution that everyone gave made this wedding all the more meaningful to my mom and our new family. Even though I had to fly back to Chicago before the week-long family camping trip to Maine, I feel rejuvenated and hopeful. Living in South Bend, so far from my mom and sister, has been difficult, but now I know that they’re all together, watching over each other and having way too much fun without me. This weekend was life-changing, beautiful and insane. And it never rained.  Contact Meghan Thomassen at mthomass@nd.edu,Last January, I got a phone call from my mom, Jane, that I never could have expected. “Meghan, how do I ask a guy if he wants to go on a date?” My parents got divorced eight years ago, but never had my mom liked a guy enough to make the first move – that is, until David came along. David is a tall, sweet, handsome father from the heart of Revere, Mass. His daughter attended the same dance school as my sister, Erin, and my mom noticed how gentle and attentive David was with his three kids whenever she went to pick up Erin after class. “How do I let him know that I’m interested?” Welcome to the club, Mom. “Ask him out!” I suggested. So, she did. They got coffee, started to date, fell in love and were engaged within a year. I take all the credit. And this weekend, my mom and David finally made it official. After my boyfriend, Anthony, and I landed in Boston, we set straight to work. We only had three days to pull off the outdoor wedding from scratch. After spending Friday and Saturday crossing things off our checklists and reuniting with family members, the big day finally arrived. The wedding was held at The Yankee Clipper Inn in Rockport, Mass. It’s a colorful port town near Gloucester, the city known for “The Perfect Storm.” It was a foggy, cool day and the Clipper is an eight-bedroom inn perched right on the harbor’s rocky shore. The inn was like something on a postcard. I, however, felt as if the low-hanging clouds, at any moment, would condense into rain and ruin the outdoor ceremony. The happy couple was supposed to say their vows right on the edge of the lawn, under an arch that Anthony and I had decorated. I prayed that the downpour would hold off for at least a little while. “It’s not going to rain,” Anthony reassured me. “At least just wait until the ceremony is over,” I bargained with the elements. “Just until we can get under the tents.” This was my J-Lo “Wedding Planner” dream come true, except I was also a co-maid of honor with my sister, and I had the best team I could have asked for. They say it takes a village, but they hadn’t seen my family and friends in action yet. We stowed the bride in her room to get ready, hung the garland, laid out the tablecloths, set up the dance floor, moved in the band, put the finishing touches on the flowers and directed guests to their seats. The patio and tables were covered in hydrangeas spray-painted the right color at the last minute by my brilliant friend and florist, who pulled an all-nighter to finish his job at the bakery and still arrange all our flowers and bouquets. Our neighbor of 18 years made a gorgeous, three-tiered chocolate and buttercream frosting cake covered in icing seashells. My sister’s prom date brought his band to serenade us through the night, her French teacher took professional photos and a family from church served as the catering company. The bridesmaids, my sister and my future stepsisters, all wore soft pink and sea green dresses they picked out themselves, while my future stepbrother and his dad wore suits and white roses for boutonnières. Most importantly of all, my mom positively glowed in a tea-length white frock with sheer polka-dotted tulle. Everything and everyone came together perfectly. The band was warming up, my mother was blushing, I had the wedding ring and I was ready to finally call David, Dan, Analise and Ysabelle my family. My mom only looked like she was going to cry once, while her brother walked her down the aisle. But she made it through the vows, and I could see love made perfect in David’s eyes as he promised himself to my mother. The rest of the night was a blur. Relieved and ecstatic, we partied until the sun went down. I couldn’t thank everyone enough for how much they did for my mom and David. As crazy and hectic these past few months have been coordinating and planning and re-checking all the lists and reservations, each small contribution that everyone gave made this wedding all the more meaningful to my mom and our new family. Even though I had to fly back to Chicago before the week-long family camping trip to Maine, I feel rejuvenated and hopeful. Living in South Bend, so far from my mom and sister, has been difficult, but now I know that they’re all together, watching over each other and having way too much fun without me. This weekend was life changing, beautiful and insane. And it never rained.last_img read more

Reliance chairman says India on path to renewable energy transition in next few decades

December 31, 2020 0 Comments

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:India will fully move away from fossil fuels to renewable energy in the next few decades, the chairman of Reliance Industries, operator of the world’s biggest refining complex, said on Monday.Reliance, which operates two giant refineries with a combined capacity of 1.4 million barrels per day in western India, aims to become a net zero carbon company by 2035.“India is in the right mindset to completely, in the next few decades, move away from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Be Atmanirbhar (self dependent),” Mukesh Ambani said at a book launch event on Monday.India, the world’s third biggest oil importer and consumer, ships in about 80% of its oil needs.Reliance Group, which works across the oil, telecom and retail sectors, aims to build up a mix of clean and affordable energy with hydrogen, wind, solar, fuel cells and battery power, Ambani told shareholders earlier this year.[Nidhi Verma]More: Reliance says India will fully shift to renewable energy in next few decades Reliance chairman says India on path to renewable energy transition in next few decadeslast_img read more

Nassau Officer Acquitted of Harrassing Colleagues

December 18, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Nassau County police officer was aqcuitted of harassing her colleagues who arrested her while she was off-duty after a parking dispute with on-duty officers who accused her of resisting arrest.A Nassau County jury found Dolores Sharpe, 53, not guilty Wednesday of harassment and resisting arrest charges following a two-week-long trial.“I am free of this dark cloud that these men placed over me and my good name,” Officer Sharpe said. “I did nothing wrong and today the jury made that fact clear.”Officers Charles Volpe and Victor Gladitz, who are white, had arrested Sharpe, who is black, for allegedly trying to strike one of the officers “in his face with a neck chain by swinging it at him” and later “refused to comply with multiple lawful orders to place her hands behind her back,” the officers alleged in  court documents.The altercation occurred Nov. 29, 2013 the parking lot of a store in Hempstead, where Sharpe was shopping at the time, authorities have said. One of the officers accused Sharpe of blocking his view during an investigation. Heated words were reportedly exchanged by both sides, but Sharpe’s lawyer said the arresting officers crossed a line.“Not only was this incident one which subjected Officer Sharpe to an extreme level of humiliation, but the clear attempt by these two officers was to personally degrade her and deprive her of any sense of dignity,” said Sharpe’s Hempstead-based attorney, Frederick Brewington. “The County of Nassau and its Police Department have been asked to investigate the actions of the two officers and consider charges of perjury against at least one of them.”In addition to the arrest, Sharpe later served a 30-day unpaid suspension. A police spokesman has said that an internal affiars investigation into the case is continuing.Prosecutors said they respected the outcome.“An arrest was made, allegations were reviewed, the evidence was presented and a jury carefully considered the case, as evidenced by their four-day deliberation,” said Paul Leonard, a spokesman for Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas. “Judge Kluewer presided over a fair trial. We respect the jury process and their verdict.”last_img read more

Not just a load of old cobblers

October 20, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Armenians protest introduction of mandatory private pensions

September 29, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgProtesters have argued that people should be able to decide what happens to their salaries, and that any supplementary pension payment should be voluntary.Some news sources reported that the protesters have also filed a petition with the Constitutional Court.So far, the government has made no comment on the protests or the petition. Thousands of Armenians have taken to the streets to protest the mandatory funding of the second-pillar pension system, introduced at the beginning of this year.According to reports from French news agency AFP, approximately 6,000 protesters marched in the Armenian capital of Yerevan over the weekend to protest against the government’s controversial decision. Since 1 January, all Armenians born after 1974 have had to transfer 5% of their salaries to newly created pension funds managed by the local subsidiaries of France’s Amundi and Germany’s Talanx Asset Management.According to the AFP, Naira Zohrabyan, secretary of opposition party Prosperous Armenia, described the law as a “racket”, allowing the government to “get its hands into people’s pockets”.last_img read more

Vice CEO to Leave Maersk

September 28, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgClaus V. Hemmingsen is to step down as Vice CEO of A.P. Moller – Maersk and CEO of the Energy division, having successfully concluded the separation of the group’s oil and oil-related businesses.Maersk Tankers, Maersk Oil and Maersk Drilling were separated as part of the transformation initiated in 2016 in order for Maersk to focus on becoming the global integrator of container logistics.As informed, the Energy division will close down latest by the end of June 2019, and Claus Hemmingsen will subsequently leave Maersk.Hemmingsen joined Maersk in 1981 as a shipping trainee and has been stationed in Hong Kong, Singapore and Denmark, where he has held several leading positions within both the shipping and offshore industries. He was CEO for Maersk Drilling from 2005 and until his appointment as Vice CEO of A.P. Moller – Maersk and CEO of the Energy division in 2016.The Energy division has since 2016 found new ownership structures for Maersk Tankers, Maersk Oil and Maersk Drilling focused on protecting the assets and capabilities of the businesses. A.P. Moller – Maersk managed to strengthen the financial stability and freed up resources to focus future growth on container logistics, executing on USD 12 billion worth of corporate transactions.“We have now concluded the task of finding new structural solutions for the majority of A.P. Moller – Maersk’s energy businesses, enabling their continued development and growth under new ownership structures,” Claus Hemmingsen said.Last week, Maersk unveiled it would no longer pursue a separation solution for its offshore marine services business. Maersk Supply Service will be reclassified from discontinued operations to continuing operations in A.P. Møller – Mærsk.It has been estimated that Maersk’s transformation from a conglomerate to an integrated global container logistics company is to last between three to five years.On April 2, Maersk investors expressed their concerns about the stage of the progress to remake the group. However, the main shareholder and the chairman of the group backed the management’s efforts being made in that context, Reuters reported.Ane Maersk Mc-Kinney Uggla, chairwoman of the A.P. Moller Foundation, has described the shipping group as a “supertanker” taking a long time to turn around. Although 2018 was challending for the group, there have also been many good things in its transformation, according to the chairwoman.In 2018, A.P. Moller – Maersk reported an increase in revenue of 26% to USD 39 billion compared to USD 30.9 billion reported a year earlier, with growth in all segments. EBITDA for the year was USD 3.8 billion, increasing from USD 3.5 billion seen in 2017, in line with the company’s latest guidance of USD 3.6 – 4 billion.Net profit including discontinued operations was USD 3.2 billion, against a loss of USD 1.2 billion reported in the previous year, positively impacted by an accounting gain of USD 2.6 billion from the closing of the Maersk Oil transaction in 2018 and impairment in Maersk Drilling.last_img read more

Half of teachers forced to feed pupils going hungry (UK)

September 27, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgGuardian (UK) 19 June 2012Heads and doctors want needy children to get free breakfast as Guardian survey reveals upsurge in demand. Headteachers and senior doctors are calling for needy children to receive a free breakfast at school after a Guardian survey found almost half of teachers have brought food in for pupils who arrive at school with empty stomachs. Four out of five teachers (83%) see pupils who are hungry in the morning and 55% said up to a quarter of pupils arrive having not eaten enough. More than half say the number of children involved has been rising in the past year or two, which have seen some families hit hard by the recession, unemployment and benefit cuts. In the survey of 591 teachers across Britain who belong to the online Guardian Teacher Network, 49% said they have taken food or fruit into school to give to children who have not had breakfast. Almost one in five (17%) have given such pupils money out of their own pockets to buy lunch.The teachers’ survey also found that:• 72% identified lack of parenting skills as a reason for the growing number of pupils going hungry; 58% said family health or social problems; 44% said lack of family time; 41% cited benefit cuts and 35% said cost-of-living pressures.http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jun/19/breadline-britain-hungry-schoolchildren-breakfastlast_img read more

Guv to NOCPPO OIC: ‘Keep Negros Occ. safe at all times’

September 25, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgPalgue urged the personnel to have the three C’s – character, competence and credibility – which he saw in the life of Brigadier General Rene Pamuspusan, director of Police Regional Office 6. “He’s an Ilocano who has been in the police service for 25 years. I’m confident he’s up for the job,” he said. Lacson confirmed that Palgue, who hails from Nueva Ecija, was his choice among those included in the shortlist for next NOCPPO chief. Gov. Eugenio Jose Lacson (left) speaks with Col. Romy Palgue (right), who assumes as officer-in-charge of the Negros Occidental Police Provincial Office June 4. The governor instructed Palgue to keep the province safe at all times. PIO NEGROS OCCIDENTAL VIA PNA “I know that the local chief executives here are very supportive. That’s why many applied to become the provincial director here,” he said. BACOLOD City – Gov. Eugenio Jose Lacson has instructed the new officer-in-charge (OIC) of the Negros Occidental Police Provincial Office (NOCPPO) to always ensure the safety of the Negrenses.Lacson issued the directive as he welcomed Colonel Romy Palgue as the successor of Colonel Romeo Baleros, who stepped down from his post as provincial police director on Thursday afternoon as he reached the mandatory retirement age of 56 today.“I’m confident he will continue what has been done by the previous provincial directors. It’s very important that he can keep Negros Occidental safe at all times,” the governor said in an interview after the turnover of command and retirement honors for Baleros held at the parade grounds of the NOCPPO headquarters inside Camp Alfredo Montelibano Sr. here. The governor also told Palgue to follow the orders of President Rodrigo Duterte on the “war on drugs.” “I’m confident that Colonel Romy (Palgue) would be able to keep the threat of drugs away from every Negrense,” he added. Palgue, a member of PNP Academy Class 1997, was assigned at the PNP Directorate for Human Resource and Doctrine Development.(With a report from PNA/PN) In his inaugural speech, Palgue thanked Lacson for selecting him and requesting the Philippine National Police (PNP) hierarchy to appoint him as the OIC provincial police director. Keep NegOcc safe at all times, guv tells police OIClast_img read more

Pirates Set Sail For State

September 24, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgGreensburg students and faculty sent their team off to state with a pep rally Thursday.The Greensburg Pirates hope to become the first back to back state basketball champions in school history.They will battle the Bowman Academy Eagles, of Gary, for the Class 3A state title. Tipoff is 6 p.m. on Saturday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.The Pirates won the 3A championship and Bowman Academy won the 2A title last year, making Saturday’s game the first time two defending champions will faceoff for the IHSAA 3A final.The 13-players that make up the Greensburg squad have spent the past week in anticipation of the game, while managing expectations and homework. The week prior to the state championship last year fell on spring break, while school has been in session this time around.On Wednesday night, some members of the team watched an NBA basketball game on television between the Indiana Pacers and Miami Heat. Less than 24 hours later, the Greensburg Pirates were practicing on the same court Lebron James was on the night before.Junior Ryan Welage said, “It is an honor just to be able to play on the same court!”The team returned home from Indianapolis on Thursday afternoon to a pep rally in the high school gym. Welage said the team enjoys the build up to the big game, but is taking their opponent seriously.“Watching a lot of film, our coaches have been doing a great job giving us a scouting report on every player,” Welage said. “[Bowman] plays a lot different than any other team we have faced before, so practice has been a lot different and it has been tough to prepare but the coaches have been doing great getting us ready for the game.”The Greensburg community has been hit hard by recent tragedy. Students and faculty have mourned the loss of two classmates within the past month. The players hope the success on the basketball court can bring some joy to a community that can certainly use it.“I think the basketball team has been a good rallying point for everyone. We have brought some good news to this town. I know there has been some bad stuff, but some good news around here is good,” senior Macy Holdsworth said.Greensburg High School Principal Phillip Chapple noted the each player on the team also makes good grades in class.Chapple said on Thursday, “My AP Calculus teacher said half of the students are out of class today at practice!”last_img read more

Leora Scudder

September 24, 2020 0 Comments

first_imgLeora A. Scudder, 96, of Elk River, Minnesota, formerly of Aurora, Indiana, passed away on Wednesday, August 3, 2016.She was born on September 20, 1919 to the late Alvin and Mary (Brennan) Althoff at Bear Branch, IN.She was a member of the Alliance Church in Aurora. During the war Leora worked as a lathe operator for GE and later helped run a store for her husband and brother-in-law before staying at home to raise her children.Leora is survived by her children, Joseph (Nancy Gray) Scudder of Sycamore, IL and Janet (Joe) Swenson of Ramsey, MN; grandsons, Kyle (Julie) and Ryan (Kayla) Swenson; great-grandchildren, Kelsey, Benjamin, Sullivan, Heidi and Laurel.She was preceded in death by her parents; her loving husband, Lawrence; brother, William Althoff, and sisters, Orene Campbell and Mildred Jones.Visitation will be held Monday, August 8, 2016 from 10:00 am – 12:00 noon at Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Funeral services will be held immediately following visitation at noon with Pastor Dean Greenwood officiating.Burial will take place in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana.Memorials are suggested to the Alliance Church of Aurora, Gideons International or Guardian Angels Care Center in Elk River.last_img read more